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How to Be Good at Improvisation

How to Be Good at Improvisation
Improvisation is a skill that many amateur and professional actors find it hard to master. This is largely because many actors are used to relying on a script to inform dialogue and to set the parameters of a given scene. However, almost anyone can master the art of improvisation and have fun doing it. By getting experience, learning the basic tenets of improvisation, and immersing yourself in a scene, you’ll improve your improvisational skills and ultimately become a better actor.

Part One of Four:
Getting Experience

1
Take an improv class in person. Search online or in your yellow pages for improv classes near you. Improv classes may be hosted at a local educational institution or by an acting coach. At improv classes, you’ll be instructed about best practices when it comes to improv. In addition, you’ll be able to practice with other members of your class.[1]
Depending on where these classes are held, they may be free or you may have to pay a fee to participate.

2
Look for acting classes online. There are a wide variety of online acting classes you can take. While some of these classes will focus on fundamentals and other aspects of acting, some may include a unit on improv or may even focus on it. Take some time to find a class that fits your schedule.
View https://www.class-central.com/subject/film-and-theatre for a list of free online film and theatre classes.

3
Join an improv group. Improv groups are typically groups of people just like you who enjoy improv acting and are interested in becoming better at it. Find a group by asking your improv class instructor, searching online, or inquiring with friends who are also interested in improv.[2]
Improv groups may meet weekly or monthly.
4
Get acting roles. Audition for acting roles in your community or nationally. You can focus primarily on roles that allow you to practice your improvisational skills or you can apply for scripted roles. Ultimately, the more experience you have acting (scripted or improv), the more comfortable and successful you’ll be on the stage.[3]
Part Two of Four:
Interacting with Your Partner
1
Ask questions. If you find yourself running out of material, ask a question. Questions will not only allow you to shift the burden of the scene to your partner, but will provide an important cue for your partner.
Question your partner about details they’ve already shared. For example, if your improv partner mentions that they served time in jail, ask them about it.[4]
2
Respond to questions. If your partner asks you a question, answer it. Turn their question into an opportunity to talk about something. Ultimately, you and your partner can take turns asking and responding to each other’s questions. This will create a natural dialogue.
For example, if your partner asks you what you had for dinner, tell them seafood. Then, use the opportunity to share a scene-appropriate story about the ocean with your partner and the audience.[5]
3
Watch their body language. Your partner may send you non-verbal signals that could give you an idea of how to respond to them or where to go in the scene. By responding to body language and non-verbal signals, you’ll take pressure off yourself and make the scene seem more natural.
Pay attention to your partner’s demeanor and use it as a cue. For example, if they are hunched over and seem depressed, use the opportunity to cheer them up. This will make the scene much more dynamic.[6]
4
Respond naturally. When your partner says something to you, respond to them as if you were having a conversation with an old friend. Don’t force conversation or dialogue. Just say whatever comes to mind in the context of the scene you are performing. Forced dialogue will sound awkward.[7]
Say what comes naturally. For example, if your partner mentions the death of a loved one, respond with surprise and concern, as you would in real life.
Part Three of Four:
Immersing Yourself in the Scene
1
Own your character. Once you know what scene you’re performing and the person you are portraying, do everything you can to commit yourself to your character. Do this by trying to think like the character and sympathize and empathize with them. Use all of the knowledge you have to put yourselves into their shoes so you can respond in a natural and fluid way.[8]
2
Be specific. When telling a story, you should include lots of specific examples. Without specifics, your partner may not have a clear idea of what you are talking about. In addition, specifics will make your improv more believable. Finally, specifics will possibly make the scene you’re acting out more interesting.[9]
Use descriptive words whenever you can.
Go beyond general statements. Instead of saying “I was in a car accident last night,” explain how a milk truck flipped over in front of you, attracting dozens of cats, one of which you swerved to avoid hitting.
3
Think of your acting as telling a story. Fundamentally, acting is story telling. When you are doing improv, don’t take for granted that the audience (or even your improv partner) knows what you are taking about. Use the scene as an opportunity to make an idea come to life.[10]
Part Four of Four:
Remembering Basic Improv Rules
1
Remind yourself to have fun. For almost all improv actors, the point of improv is to have fun acting. If you’re not having fun, you’re probably doing something wrong. So, before you start a scene, remind yourself why you love improv acting. Start the scene with a light heart and a desire to have fun.[11]
2
Use mistakes as an opportunity to explore the scene. Before acting, you should internalize the idea that mistakes don’t really matter in improv. The whole idea of improv is to let scenes and interactions unfold naturally without a script. What you would normally consider a mistake in scripted acting is just a part of the scene in improv.[12]
If you think you’ve made a mistake, use the opportunity to turn it into part of the scene you’re exploring.
3
Avoid feeling pressured to stick to a script. Since there is no script in improv, you are free to explore a scene or interaction in any way you and your partner want. Your imagination, then, is one of the biggest assets you can bring into improv acting.[13]
Try to act outside of your own perspective. Remember, use your imagination to place yourself into the position of the character you’re playing and into the context of the scene you are acting out.
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Community Q&A
What movies are improvised? Answered by wikiHow Contributor
In Disney’s Aladdin (1992), Robin Williams improvised A LOT of his dialogue as the Genie.
How can I make it seem I have become someone else? Answered by wikiHow Contributor
Look at the lines or situation you have been given. Look at how that character integrates with the rest of society. Then, act as if you are that character.
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Source and Citations
http://takelessons.com/blog/improv-acting-tips

http://takelessons.com/blog/improv-acting-tips

https://www.backstage.com/advice-for-actors/backstage-experts/backstage-experts-answer-12-tips-where-begin-your-acting-career/

https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/the-two-person-scene

https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/the-two-person-scene

https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/the-two-person-scene

http://takelessons.com/blog/improv-acting-tips

http://www.dangoldstein.com/howtoimprovise.html

http://www.dangoldstein.com/howtoimprovise.html

http://improvencyclopedia.org/references/5_Basic_Improv_Rules.html

http://www.humorthatworks.com/learning/10-life-tips-from-improv-class/

http://takelessons.com/blog/improv-acting-tips

http://takelessons.com/blog/improv-acting-tips

About This Article
Co-authors: 31
Updated: August 15, 2017
Views: 47,273
Article Rating: 100% – 2 votes
Categories: Arts and Entertainment
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How to Be a Stage Manager

How to Be a Stage Manager
Being a part of a live performing art production can be very exciting and fulfilling. A stage manager is in charge of the entire production, and must know the ins and outs of every production they oversee. A stage manager must know how to do every job in the production. Strong leadership and communication skills are also important. Once you have the necessary skills, you can apply at local schools and colleges, theatres and playhouses, as well as concert halls and music venues.

Part One of Three:
Gaining Theatre Experience

1
Take theatre classes. Theatre classes aren’t just for budding actors. See if your local community college offers classes in touring production, stage lighting, or theatre management. You can also get a degree in stage management, theatre practice, or technical theatre. Whether you take one class or many, you’ll learn invaluable skills and tips for managing a production.[1]

2
Volunteer at a theatre. To gain valuable experience, volunteer at your local high school, playhouse, or theatre. They are always looking for people to help make their production a success. They don’t pay much (or none at all), so go into it with an open mind and open heart. You’ll get to be part of a production and make connections with others who have a love for theatre.
This is a great learning opportunity for someone who is older but looking to break into stage management. Volunteering allows you to work with more experienced people and gain knowledge of the industry.

3
Try out every position. In order to become a stage manager, it is essential that you know how to do every job in the theatre. Work on the set, coordinate costumes, help with hair and makeup, become a prop master, assist the director, and learn how to work the rigging, stage lighting, and audio equipment.[2]
If you don’t have any theatre experience, try becoming a stagehand or spotlight operator first. You’ll work closely with the stage manager and learn what’s required for that role.
Part Two of Three:
Getting a Stage Managing Job
1
Apply for an internship. Many large companies, like Disney Theatrical Group, offer internships for students. Taking a position like this can help you get your foot in the door and increase your chances of landing a job as a stage manager. Not only will you get to see amazing productions and work with professionals, there is also a chance you could get hired on permanently.[3]
2
Apply at local theatres. Research theatres and playhouses in your area and visit each one. Bring your resume as well as any referrals or letters of recommendation, and inquire about stage management openings. If there are none, ask the person you speak to if they know of any openings.
3
See if there’s an opening at a school near you. Middle schools, high school, colleges, and universities usually have theatre departments. Visit all the schools in your area and see if they have any openings for stage managers. This would be a great position for someone who enjoys working with kids. Make sure you are prepared for your visit by dressing professionally and bringing your credentials with you.
4
Apply at music venues. Concert halls and other music venues, even outdoor rock and roll shows, also require stage directors. If you can’t find an opening at a theatre, try managing the stage for music productions. Many of the responsibilities, such as overseeing artists and keeping track of show times, will be similar. Plus, you’ll gain experience to add to your resume.[4]
5
Network. Networking is a great way to find a job. Make connections with other people in the industry, especially from past productions you have worked on. If you show your coworkers that you are dedicated and knowledgeable, they may refer you when they hear of a stage manager position available.[5]
Reach out to people you already know in the industry. Ask for recommendations or referrals.
Attend as many productions as possible. Stick around after the performance and introduce yourself to members of the cast and crew, when appropriate.
Part Three of Three:
Putting Your Best Foot Forward
1
Wear black and dress conservatively. Wearing black is a must in all theaters; it keeps the crew from being too visible on the wings of the stage. Dressing conservatively is a must for all professional jobs, so be sure not to wear anything too showy or revealing — you want to blend in, not stand out. Invest in several black tops and pants so you will always have a clean supply.[6]
2
Dedicate your time. A stage manager is a very demanding job, time-wise. You need to have enough time in your schedule to be early to every single event, whether it be a meeting, rehearsal, dress rehearsal, or a performance. You’ll also need to set up for every event, as well as clean up afterwards.[7]
3
Be assertive. Stage managers have a lot of people and things to keep track of. You must remain calm, cool, and collected. However, stand your ground when needed to make sure that things are progressing as they should be. Be assertive, but polite to the cast, crew, and guests.
Express yourself directly and openly. Don’t be afraid to tell others how you feel, or how you think they are doing in their own roles. Give specific examples of ways they can improve, and be sure to praise them when they follow your advice. Be firm but still friendly.
4
Provide great customer service. Guests coming to see the production need to be treated well so they have the best possible experience. Though you will likely be busy with numerous other things, take guest’s requests or complaints seriously and do your best to attend to them.
For instance, if someone complains about gum on the floor, assure them it will be taken care of immediately, and then get someone from your crew or the house management crew to clean it up if you are in a tight spot.
If someone approaches you during a break in the performance and tells you they are unable to hear the dialogue or music, take steps to rectify the situation. Adjust the audio for that section of the theatre if others in the area are having similar trouble. You could also offer the person another seat in a different section, if possible.
5
Improve your leadership skills. Stage managers are in charge of the entire production, so you must be a good leader for this job. You’ll need to know how to delegate tasks and manage other people. Stage managers must be patient, calm, and level-headed, especially when things go wrong.[8]
To be a great leader, you need to be an active listener. When someone is speaking with you, give them your undivided attention and make eye contact. Don’t interrupt or judge them, but do try to understand where they are coming from.
Great leaders also take responsibility for their actions. Own up to any mistakes you make, and realize that as the stage manager you will be responsible for mistakes that other people make as well. Make sure someone is able to effectively complete a task before delegating it.
6
Communicate clearly. You’ll need to be able to communicate well with a variety of people on the cast and crew. Not only will you be in charge of the stage crew, you’ll also have to communicate with the director, choreographer, and actors. Stage managers also schedule meetings and call times, take notes during meetings, and write up rehearsal reports.[9]
Speak clearly and assertively to everyone you encounter. You should also be specific when making requests to others in order to avoid confusion.
Body language is also a part of communication. Demonstrate friendliness and approachability by using open body language, such as smiling and angling toward people who are speaking. Avoid frowning, crossing your arms, and fidgeting.
7
Stay organized. There are many things for a stage manager to take care of and coordinate, so you’ll need to be organized. Keep a notebook for each production to jot down rehearsal and call times, contact info for the cast and crew, blocking notations from the director, etc.[10]
Pay attention to the details. You’ll need to keep track of everything from the names of the understudies to the quality of the gel sheets for the stage lights.
You can also make to-do lists, set deadlines for tasks, and multitask in order to get everything accomplished on time.

You’re helping people by reading wikiHow
wikiHow’s mission is to help people learn, and we really hope this article helped you. Now you are helping others, just by visiting wikiHow.

World Possible is a nonprofit organization focused on connecting offline learners to the world’s knowledge. They work to ensure that anyone can access the best educational resources from the web anytime, anywhere, even if they do not have an internet connection.

Click below to let us know you read this article, and wikiHow will donate to World Possible on your behalf. Thanks for helping us achieve our mission of helping people learn how to do anything.

Yes, I read the article
Related wikiHows
How to
Become an Art Investor
How to
Critique Artwork
How to
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About This Article
Co-authors: 20
Updated: July 24, 2017
Views: 35,574
Article Rating: 100% – 4 votes
Categories: Theater | Arts and Entertainment
Sources and Attribution
Reader Success Stories
DS
Dee Sanchez
Sep 13, 2017

“My daughter is planning her first high school play. You listed any and all the ins and outs of what it takes to…” more
Did this article help you?
Yes
No

How to Be a Stage Manager

How to Be a Stage Manager
Being a part of a live performing art production can be very exciting and fulfilling. A stage manager is in charge of the entire production, and must know the ins and outs of every production they oversee. A stage manager must know how to do every job in the production. Strong leadership and communication skills are also important. Once you have the necessary skills, you can apply at local schools and colleges, theatres and playhouses, as well as concert halls and music venues.

Part One of Three:
Gaining Theatre Experience

1
Take theatre classes. Theatre classes aren’t just for budding actors. See if your local community college offers classes in touring production, stage lighting, or theatre management. You can also get a degree in stage management, theatre practice, or technical theatre. Whether you take one class or many, you’ll learn invaluable skills and tips for managing a production.[1]

2
Volunteer at a theatre. To gain valuable experience, volunteer at your local high school, playhouse, or theatre. They are always looking for people to help make their production a success. They don’t pay much (or none at all), so go into it with an open mind and open heart. You’ll get to be part of a production and make connections with others who have a love for theatre.
This is a great learning opportunity for someone who is older but looking to break into stage management. Volunteering allows you to work with more experienced people and gain knowledge of the industry.

3
Try out every position. In order to become a stage manager, it is essential that you know how to do every job in the theatre. Work on the set, coordinate costumes, help with hair and makeup, become a prop master, assist the director, and learn how to work the rigging, stage lighting, and audio equipment.[2]
If you don’t have any theatre experience, try becoming a stagehand or spotlight operator first. You’ll work closely with the stage manager and learn what’s required for that role.
Part Two of Three:
Getting a Stage Managing Job
1
Apply for an internship. Many large companies, like Disney Theatrical Group, offer internships for students. Taking a position like this can help you get your foot in the door and increase your chances of landing a job as a stage manager. Not only will you get to see amazing productions and work with professionals, there is also a chance you could get hired on permanently.[3]
2
Apply at local theatres. Research theatres and playhouses in your area and visit each one. Bring your resume as well as any referrals or letters of recommendation, and inquire about stage management openings. If there are none, ask the person you speak to if they know of any openings.
3
See if there’s an opening at a school near you. Middle schools, high school, colleges, and universities usually have theatre departments. Visit all the schools in your area and see if they have any openings for stage managers. This would be a great position for someone who enjoys working with kids. Make sure you are prepared for your visit by dressing professionally and bringing your credentials with you.
4
Apply at music venues. Concert halls and other music venues, even outdoor rock and roll shows, also require stage directors. If you can’t find an opening at a theatre, try managing the stage for music productions. Many of the responsibilities, such as overseeing artists and keeping track of show times, will be similar. Plus, you’ll gain experience to add to your resume.[4]
5
Network. Networking is a great way to find a job. Make connections with other people in the industry, especially from past productions you have worked on. If you show your coworkers that you are dedicated and knowledgeable, they may refer you when they hear of a stage manager position available.[5]
Reach out to people you already know in the industry. Ask for recommendations or referrals.
Attend as many productions as possible. Stick around after the performance and introduce yourself to members of the cast and crew, when appropriate.
Part Three of Three:
Putting Your Best Foot Forward
1
Wear black and dress conservatively. Wearing black is a must in all theaters; it keeps the crew from being too visible on the wings of the stage. Dressing conservatively is a must for all professional jobs, so be sure not to wear anything too showy or revealing — you want to blend in, not stand out. Invest in several black tops and pants so you will always have a clean supply.[6]
2
Dedicate your time. A stage manager is a very demanding job, time-wise. You need to have enough time in your schedule to be early to every single event, whether it be a meeting, rehearsal, dress rehearsal, or a performance. You’ll also need to set up for every event, as well as clean up afterwards.[7]
3
Be assertive. Stage managers have a lot of people and things to keep track of. You must remain calm, cool, and collected. However, stand your ground when needed to make sure that things are progressing as they should be. Be assertive, but polite to the cast, crew, and guests.
Express yourself directly and openly. Don’t be afraid to tell others how you feel, or how you think they are doing in their own roles. Give specific examples of ways they can improve, and be sure to praise them when they follow your advice. Be firm but still friendly.
4
Provide great customer service. Guests coming to see the production need to be treated well so they have the best possible experience. Though you will likely be busy with numerous other things, take guest’s requests or complaints seriously and do your best to attend to them.
For instance, if someone complains about gum on the floor, assure them it will be taken care of immediately, and then get someone from your crew or the house management crew to clean it up if you are in a tight spot.
If someone approaches you during a break in the performance and tells you they are unable to hear the dialogue or music, take steps to rectify the situation. Adjust the audio for that section of the theatre if others in the area are having similar trouble. You could also offer the person another seat in a different section, if possible.
5
Improve your leadership skills. Stage managers are in charge of the entire production, so you must be a good leader for this job. You’ll need to know how to delegate tasks and manage other people. Stage managers must be patient, calm, and level-headed, especially when things go wrong.[8]
To be a great leader, you need to be an active listener. When someone is speaking with you, give them your undivided attention and make eye contact. Don’t interrupt or judge them, but do try to understand where they are coming from.
Great leaders also take responsibility for their actions. Own up to any mistakes you make, and realize that as the stage manager you will be responsible for mistakes that other people make as well. Make sure someone is able to effectively complete a task before delegating it.
6
Communicate clearly. You’ll need to be able to communicate well with a variety of people on the cast and crew. Not only will you be in charge of the stage crew, you’ll also have to communicate with the director, choreographer, and actors. Stage managers also schedule meetings and call times, take notes during meetings, and write up rehearsal reports.[9]
Speak clearly and assertively to everyone you encounter. You should also be specific when making requests to others in order to avoid confusion.
Body language is also a part of communication. Demonstrate friendliness and approachability by using open body language, such as smiling and angling toward people who are speaking. Avoid frowning, crossing your arms, and fidgeting.
7
Stay organized. There are many things for a stage manager to take care of and coordinate, so you’ll need to be organized. Keep a notebook for each production to jot down rehearsal and call times, contact info for the cast and crew, blocking notations from the director, etc.[10]
Pay attention to the details. You’ll need to keep track of everything from the names of the understudies to the quality of the gel sheets for the stage lights.
You can also make to-do lists, set deadlines for tasks, and multitask in order to get everything accomplished on time.

You’re helping people by reading wikiHow
wikiHow’s mission is to help people learn, and we really hope this article helped you. Now you are helping others, just by visiting wikiHow.

World Possible is a nonprofit organization focused on connecting offline learners to the world’s knowledge. They work to ensure that anyone can access the best educational resources from the web anytime, anywhere, even if they do not have an internet connection.

Click below to let us know you read this article, and wikiHow will donate to World Possible on your behalf. Thanks for helping us achieve our mission of helping people learn how to do anything.

Yes, I read the article
Related wikiHows
How to
Become an Art Investor
How to
Critique Artwork
How to
Critique Literature
How to
Make a Radio Show
How to
Be Well Read
How to
Make a Movie Set
How to
Be a Good Entertainer
How to
Be a Visual Effects Artist
How to
Become an Art Director in Film
How to
Be Talented in Multiple Areas
About This Article
Co-authors: 20
Updated: July 24, 2017
Views: 35,574
Article Rating: 100% – 4 votes
Categories: Theater | Arts and Entertainment
Sources and Attribution
Reader Success Stories
DS
Dee Sanchez
Sep 13, 2017

“My daughter is planning her first high school play. You listed any and all the ins and outs of what it takes to…” more
Did this article help you?
Yes
No

How to Be a Good Entertainer

Reader Approved
How to Be a Good Entertainer
Entertainers have one of the best and hardest jobs in the world. Night after night, they put themselves on the line in the hopes of connecting with an audience and evoking an emotional response. Some performers are born with amazing stage presence, but if you weren’t, that’s okay. Stage presence is definitely something that can be learned and improved over time.

Method One of Three:
Making Your Performance Memorable

1
Start with a bang. Audiences tend to be both impatient and judgmental, so you want to capture their attention as soon as possible and hold it for as long as you can. Structure your performance so it begins with something memorable or impressive to break the ice and engage the crowd.[1]
If you’re a stand up, start with a joke about your appearance or something else your audience might notice when they first look at you.
If you’re a musician, lead off with a high energy number, as opposed to a ballad.
Start off confident, but make sure to save your best trick for the end of the performance.

2
Have fun onstage. The reason people go see performers is to be entertained. It’s not entertaining to see a performer going through the motions – audiences want to see performers living out their dreams and leaving it all on the stage.[2]
If you come offstage and you’re not exhausted, then you still had more to give.
Smile! Try putting Vaseline on your teeth to keep your teeth from sticking to your lips.
The more comfortable you get with your performance or routine, the easier it will be for you to have fun.
Improvise something new every time you perform – this will keep your performance from feeling stale.
Don’t bottle your enjoyment up inside – let it out and share it with your audience. They want to live vicariously through you.
3
Don’t call attention to your mistakes. Mistakes happen in life and in art. How entertainers deal with mistakes can separate the artists from the amateurs. If you mess up, don’t worry about it and don’t telegraph your mistake to the audience.[3]
If you a make a mistake, move on. The audience probably won’t even notice if you don’t call it out.
Know that the audience is rooting for you to succeed. If you fall or mess up, they want to see you overcome and move forward.
4
End your show in a memorable way. The end of your show is the last thing your audience will remember, so it’s important to end your performance with a bang. If you plan on having an encore, make sure you prepare for it ahead of time.[4]
Leave your audience wanting more. Look at your set list and edit one to two things out.
Know when it’s time to wrap up – sometimes it’s better to end the show early than to prolong something that people clearly aren’t enjoying.
If your venue has a curfew, be respectful of that. Be cognizant of time and don’t run over.
Method Two of Three:
Taking Care of Your Audience
1
Connect with your audience. A big part of performing is sharing a piece of who you are with your audience. It’s not enough to just perform for them – you also need to engage them emotionally.[5]
The more personal you can make your performance, the more your audience will respond to it.
If you’re a musician, tell stories about your life between songs.
If you’re a stand up, do some crowd work and interact with the audience between jokes.
If you’re a dancer, don’t forget to look out and make eye contact with your audience as you perform.
2
Make your audience feel comfortable. There’s nothing more unnerving than watching a performer flounder on stage. When you’re performing, you’re responsible for your audience’s happiness, so make sure to show up well-prepared and ready to work.[6]
Don’t allow nerves to affect your performance – turn that nervous energy into a more productive performance energy.
Block out and rehearse every portion of your performance so there are no surprises for you or your audience.
3
Engage your audience. Get your audience involved in your performance. Giving them something to do will help them feel like an integral part of the experience. Get them in on the action by asking questions or including them in your jokes or tricks.[7]
If you’re a magician, have at least one trick that requires an audience volunteer.
Make sure to choose a volunteer that actually wants to participate – they won’t have fun if they just want to get off the stage.
If you’re a musician, perform a popular song and let the audience sing along for a verse.
4
Read your audience. As you begin to perform more, you’ll learn that not every audience reacts to your performance the same way. A small, intimate performance in a café is very different from a large concert venue and as a performer, you need to be able to read your audience and give them the kind of performance they want.[8]
If your audience isn’t enjoying the jokes or music you’re performing, be able to adapt on the fly and switch to something that might be more their speed.
Know that you’ll have to be bigger, louder and more energetic the larger the venue and the more people you have watching.

Method Three of Three:
Becoming a More Confident Performer
1
Master your self-talk. Self-talk is the internal dialogue that all humans have inside their heads. The more negative your self-talk is, the more it will negatively affect your confidence levels.[9]
Keep a self-talk log where you write down all the negative thoughts that come to mind when you’re practicing.
Rewrite your negative thoughts to be more positive. So “there’s no use in practicing, I’ll never become successful” turns into “successful people have to work hard and if I work hard, some day I’ll be successful too.”
2
Highlight your strengths and work on your weaknesses. All performers have something they’re good at – that’s why people want to watch them. But all performers also have weak spots, and those are the muscles you really need to stretch.[10]
Take a class and work with your instructor to improve on your weaknesses.
Find a fellow performer who is really good at what you’re bad at and ask them for advice.
When rehearsing, don’t practice what you already do well – focus your session on the areas that need improvement and run those parts ad nauseam.
3
Practice in front of a mirror. Regardless of what kind of performer you are, it’s imperative that you see the way you are presenting yourself to an audience. Look at the way you carry yourself, the way you move your body. Practice what you’ll say to introduce a new song or joke.[11]
Set up a camera during your practice session and record yourself performing.
Be critical when watching it back and look for ways you can elevate your performance.
Practice each performance fifty times all the way through before stepping out on stage.[12]
4
Only compete with yourself. Art and performance are completely subjective, so placing yourself in direct competition with someone is else is reductive. Instead of focusing on who else might be performing, focus on how you can make your performance the best you’ve ever done.[13]
Think of the best performance you’ve ever had, then try to top that.
Instead of thinking about what you don’t want to mess up, think of what you want to accomplish.
5
Be grateful. Getting to perform for a living or to perform at all is a luxury. Regardless of how you feel about your craft on any given day, remind yourself that you love performing. This love and passion will shine through your performance and automatically make you a more engaging performer.
Remind yourself why you love performing every time you step out on stage.
If you’re having trouble tapping into gratitude, take a break from performing. You’ll be surprised at how much you miss it.
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Tips
Take every opportunity you can to perform. The more confident and comfortable you are on stage, the better you will be as an entertainer.
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How to Support the Arts

How to Support the Arts
If you want to support the arts and the creative people behind art, these steps will offer some direction.

Method One of Five:
Supporting the arts with your money

1
Buy the arts! Don’t argue about the price, just look at your budget and decide what you need and want in life. No matter what your income or social class, you have at least some entertainment budget and you have choices in what to get for your necessities. When buying art, you support an artist in his or her pursuit of art, so every little bit counts. The following steps provide practical suggestions for purchases that support the arts.
Both fine art and artisan creations (crafts, chefs and arts that aren’t seen as fine art) support the local economy as well as give you a higher quality of lifestyle. You may find you can afford more personal luxury after you know these artists and discover what you like most. They also need to eat, do their laundry, pay their rent and local taxes on everything, so they are also helping everyone else in the area keep their jobs by pouring your spending money into building a stronger community. In all of these things, follow your personal tastes.
Don’t buy stuff you don’t need or like just to support the arts. Specifically support the artists and artisans whose work you enjoy and collect more of it over the years as they grow artistically. Your collection will deepen as well as broaden and you’ll be an important patron to these artists. It’s a luxury, so the point is to indulge yourself and get the best of their work.

2
Support the indie artist first. When deciding to go out for a show, consider tickets for live theater instead of a movie or an indie film rather than a first-run blockbuster. You’re supporting new actors, directors, producers and live theatrical houses when you make these choices. If a favorite comes along go ahead and get the first run viewing but opt for a matinee to save money so you can also see the indie film. You’ll have more variety in your viewing pleasure and your dates may find that you are more educated, sophisticated and intellectual than if you just go to the same movies everyone talks about.
3
Buy real paintings and drawings from living artists to decorate your home. Collect real art within your budget. If you like artists you can’t afford, consider smaller original pieces, sketches rather than paintings or archival limited edition prints. Then take care of your art collection by storing it in a cool, dark, dry place (attic, closet or other air conditioned indoor area).
Frame everything and look up basic art conservation for collectors. If you vary which artists you collect, the entire collection will appreciate in value. You may not know which of your collections will become super valuable by the artist’s fame growing, but your kids and grandkids will have an incredible legacy if you spread that investment around — and do it from the heart.
Buy the artwork you fall in love with. Then stash them if your tastes change because collectors or your kids may love them later.
4
Buy books from living authors at full price. Very often discounts and bargains get taken out of the author’s royalties. The author gets paid on the net, not on the gross value of the books printed. If it’s print-on-demand and you discover independent authors you like, always purchase them direct from the author’s website versus Amazon.
If you collect e-books from living authors, you won’t need as many bookcases.
Don’t feel bad about purchasing hardcover versions of paperbacks or e-books you liked and want to reread, that’s a way to reduce your bookshelves to manageable.
5
Buy tickets to music, dance and other live performances. Again, do this within budget and focus it on your tastes. You may like Riverdance more than you like formal ballet, or you may prefer live theater off-off-Broadway types of productions. You may like concerts with big famous bands or symphony orchestras or opera. Yes, this includes live theatre as mentioned above or any type of performance art you enjoy.
Pay full price tickets to magicians and musicians.
When you pass a street performer, put some money into the performer’s hat or tip box.
Buy CDs of independent musicians who self produce them, you may be launching a someday-famous band and have a collectible — or just have a beloved CD of famous music. And if you download their music, pay for it––don’t be a freeloader as the “free music” attitude has ruined the livelihood of many a struggling yet very talented musician.
Be polite and quiet during live performances. This is especially important in pubs that have Celtic music, as the Celtic tradition is very keen on respect for bards. Don’t talk during live performances. You’re not only distracting the audience who’d like to hear the music, you may be distracting the musicians too and throwing them off their stride.
6
Hire live local musicians for your personal events — weddings, graduation parties, child’s bar or bat mitzvahs, Sweet Sixteens, family reunions or get-togethers. Why not celebrate your anniversary by hiring a live musician to serenade your spouse at a romantic dinner — or have a romantic dinner at home with a musician performing that you both love? Any kind of holiday or personal event can become lavish if you have live music. Book them well in advance, talk to them in person after a concert and find out their rates.
Find out when the band’s off season is and what causes it. You may wind up getting a bargain or a shorter wait time if you book them during a time of year they don’t get many gigs. The opposite of tourist season is often good.
For the holidays, try to book the band early, so you’re the one that gets them for your holiday party.
If you like variety, turn your annual music party into a “guess what the band is” event.
7
If you need to buy new clothes, especially for evening or party wear, consider finding a textile artist, tailor, seamstress or other artisan. Instead of going to an upscale shop where you’ll pay a high price for fancy clothing, go to an artist who will fit it to your individual body much better, create it to suit your precise looks, complexion, style and taste, and support another type of independent artist. You will get more than your money’s worth because a quality handmade original garment will last longer and if you pay for their best work, wear better than anything from even an expensive store. You can reduce the size of your wardrobe while raising its quality.
Buy handmade boots and shoes from leather crafters and artists. Again, they will be expensive but they’ll fit better, look better and wear much longer than shoes and boots from stores.
If you like buying shoes often, find your favorite artisan and have new ones designed for you periodically for fun. You might start getting a “regular customer” discount working one on one with the artist instead of just purchasing something made by mass production to sell to thousands of others. Remember, your shoes are unique, unlike anyone else’s. If they were made to fit your Christmas dress and you love them, maybe take them to your clothing designer next year to get a new Christmas dress inspired by the shoes. Artists sometimes work together on things like that. The more you know them, the more personal and unique their works are and the closer they come to your personal tastes.
8
Have jewelry handcrafted for you by artists. On a low budget, start with small silver and semiprecious stones. Once you’re up in a fine jewelry bracket, you can pay for more elaborate workmanship and more expensive materials. Especially pay attention to their original pieces or commission original pieces. Buying the stock rings and necklaces they have on hand helps the artists to survive, but when you choose their best work or commission something unique that takes the best of their skills, you also feed their souls.
9
Eat out at small chef-owned original restaurants. Food is an art form, so is ambiance, these one-of-a-kind restaurants are sometimes a lot higher quality than chain restaurants. Once you find your favorites, you’re likely to get personal attention and extra good service for a more enjoyable experience.
10
Buy handmade toys, furnishings, furniture and gifts from local artists. No matter what it is, if a local artist makes it, you are getting originality and personal attention. Your entire home can become a collection of treasured, unique, beautiful objects. Many of those things will be higher quality than manufactured goods.
11
Buy locally grown food from farmers and gardeners. Hire local landscapers to take care of your yard, unless you’re a gardener. Find the ones who are artists, look at their other gardens, then give them some artistic freedom. Yes, the flowers in your yard and the landscaping can be artwork that is an expression of who you are and what you love.
Method Two of Five:
Asking for a commissioned piece of artwork
1
When buying art, choose an artist you enjoy (of any kind, performance or tangible) and then keep your description of your commission simple. Stick to the type of work that’s their specialty.
Don’t haggle over changes, give them a hard time or get too controlling. Part of supporting the arts is to encourage the artist to go on being an artist. You’re not buying real arts in order to get the cheapest bargain or rip off the painter for a masterpiece by paying less than he did for the materials! If you do that, there’s a good chance the artist will get disgusted, quit and do something else for a living, which reduces the appreciation of that masterpiece.
Method Three of Five:
Leaving compliments for all to see
1
If you bought from a writer, an artist or a musician, review the item on Amazon, Twitter and other places online, especially if you like it. Negative reviews are a warning not to buy from an unreliable seller. The arts are far more personal, your taste comes into it. If you made a mistake and got a book you didn’t like, explain what you didn’t like in a way that people who would like it for what it is will find it enjoyable.
Try something like, “I expected this to be a lovely vampire romance and it turned out to be a horror novel with a fanged stalker who scared me to death. Don’t buy this book if you want to mush over the vampire. But if you like a good scare, it might be just your thing.” You have not only supported the writer (or artist or musician, etc.) by purchasing their original work, you’ve supported them again by word of mouth so they can sell more, make a living, pay taxes in your town, etc.
Method Four of Five:
Localizing your support for the arts
1
Support the arts in your local area. Youth theatres, amateur organizations and school productions need your support! There are hundreds of ways to get involved, whether you’re designing posters, sewing costumes or selling tickets.
Organize and help set up at festivals and fairs. Just helping a bunch of artists and crafters get their stuff unpacked and set up, or helping to organize an event that they can all show up to helps them big time!
Help promote local arts events by posting about them online, blogging them, making flyers or stapling flyers up.
If your town or city has an arts committee, find out what they need volunteers for. If it doesn’t, consider trying to form one.
Some types of local events you can help organize or prepare for are concerts, live performances including outdoor ones, art fairs, studio tours for artists, book signings and poetry readings, any of the arts can benefit from a public event and its exposure. If the artists have any recordings or physical things to sell, be sure the event’s rules allow them to sell their works even if the performance or show is free.
2
As you know practice makes perfect, so keep practicing and cultivating regularly. Be sincere.
Take classes in humanities or art, music or literature appreciation at your local community college. Some local community charges have a much lower “audit” fee if you attend the class but don’t take the tests, get a grade or college credit for it. When you’re attending just to improve your appreciation of the arts, auditing is just as good as taking the class to get in the right number of Humanities credits and leaves you more in your budget to buy real art, pay local musicians, get tickets, etc.
Method Five of Five:
Getting involved in the arts yourself
1
Get involved! The arts are about creativity and self-expression, so whatever your passion, get out there and enjoy the art. Arts are broad, including drawing, painting, performing, street theater, making murals, crafting, engaging the community in artistic projects and much more, so there are plenty of things to explore and find your own artistic niche within.
If you haven’t yet discovered the activity that’s for you, find out about free or cheap tester classes you can join. Ask if you can borrow materials initially, or look online for many cheap options such as auctions of art materials people no longer need.
2
Do some reading. Go to your local library and find books on photography, art, ballet or even the art of performance.
Read up on these arts online, whatever your particular interests are. There are many reviews and articles on all of the arts available for free. That frees your budget to make knowledgeable purchases from local artists.
3
Go to a museum or art gallery. Find an art, ballet, photo or performance museum. If you can’t go in person, see online exhibits if they are available.
When on vacation, visit museums and galleries in your vacation area. You’ll broaden your appreciation of your favorite arts and appreciate your local artists’ works even more by deepening your knowledge. You’re on vacation anyway, so why not see what artists and musicians, etc., are producing in the cool place you visited? If you take vacations in the same place every year as some people enjoy doing, you can become an annual regular and support particular artists — the local painter in your holiday spot, the little pub that always has good Celtic music, that theatre, the opera house.
If you like opera, definitely get at least bargain tickets and experience it live. Opera houses operate on a shoestring despite the number of millionaires that donate. They need to sell those empty cheap student seats at the back and it’s a wonderful experience. The productions cost so much and involve so many live people not only performing but doing all the work of creating the production that they’re always operating at a brutal budget. If you’re an opera lover who lives near an opera house, consider volunteering your time and effort to help keep the house going.
4
Donate to charities who support the arts or donate to organizations directly. For example, the National Endowment for the Arts, who help art programs throughout America. Donate to art programs You can donate to programs in your school or city.
Organize a monthly art hop. Sign up various art venues in your area that will open their doors on one evening per month. A map and list could be offered in advance to help those planning their tours. Finger foods and beverages could be served at each spot.
Donate directly to local theatres, performance companies and arts events. Many of them accept donations. Your local arts council and local theatre troupe may need the donations more than something as big as the National Endowment for the Arts.
Support PBS. Make a steady annual donation or watch when their pledge drive auctions and bid on things you want. Volunteer to work the phones at PBS pledge drives. PBS always needs it, everywhere, and doing this will also get more of your favorite programming purchased by your local PBS station. They listen to fan requests.
Purchase new copies of your favorite books at full price from living authors and donate them to your local library. The community will be better for it, those that can’t afford it will get to read it sooner, those that might never have found your favorite author may wind up buying their own copy when they have to return it. Everyone wins, and your author is more likely to continue writing instead of taking up something else because the bills need to be paid.
5
Get out there and experience it! The only way to boost your appreciation and support of the arts is to experience as many performances as possible. Be open-minded and you never know which new genres you will discover.
To save money, opt for cheaper seats or buy last-minute tickets from discount websites.
If you can’t afford original paintings from your favorite painters, consider their smaller works, sketches or limited edition prints. Whether you opt for lower priced works from the newest indie unknowns or the lower priced works by more successful artists, you will always be supporting the arts — and that supports the economy both local and national.
6
Get to know the artists. All of the arts are about communication. Forming relationships with artists and artisans, studying art appreciation and encouraging those that are growing in their arts also improves the quality of your own life. From furnishings and objects that you enjoy more than mass produced goods, to the social success of becoming more refined and knowledgeable to the inner spiritual growth that comes from awareness of beauty, supporting the arts will enrich your life in more ways than you would expect.
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Tips
Share your own artwork with others. There are chemists who are poets, lawyers who are actors and doctors who are painters. Speak up for the arts within your profession, trade and job, to allow others to feel that it’s not only okay to be creative but to also make the time to exercise creativity.
Watch artsy TV. Currently, the only artsy TV network in the USA is Ovation TV.
Things You’ll Need
Books
Transportation
Computer
Internet connection
Television
Money
supplies:
For Drawing and Painting:
pastels
pencils
easel
sketchbook
canvas
For Photography:
camera
photo editing software
photo printing paper
photo printer
For Ballet:
ballet school/teacher
music
ballet bar
For Filming:
camera(s)
scripts (drama)
word processing software (scriptwriting)
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About This Article
Co-authors: 17
Updated: August 3, 2017
Views: 48,621
Article Rating: 69% – 16 votes
Categories: Featured Articles | Arts and Entertainment
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How To Reduce Entertainment Expenses

How to Reduce Entertainment Expenses
Spending money on movies, TV, and special events can cost you a surprising amount over time. The average family spends around thousands per year on entertainment, a number that can be greatly reduced by budgeting.[1] Whether you’re trying to budget at home or while traveling, you can reduce your entertainment expenses if you know where to cut back. Keep track of your budgeting and compare one month from another to see how your spending habits change.

Method One of Three:
Budgeting At-Home Entertainment Expenses

1
Purchase a cable alternative. The first step to reducing at-home entertainment costs is ditching cable TV. Instead, choose an online streaming service. Subscribing to one of these companies can give you access to hundreds of movies, TV, and original content for usually lower cost per month. Review your most recent cable bills and find a streaming service with a lower monthly fee.[2]
Popular video streaming services include: Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Hulu, and Acorn TV.[3]
If you’re attached to a certain channel, look for a service that allows you to stream specific channels online (like Sling TV, CBS All Access, HBO Now, or Select TV).

2
Listen to music via streaming services. Instead of purchasing every song you listen to, try a music streaming service. Most services operate as an online library filled with songs that users can hear without downloading. Although these services often have an ad-free subscription for a low cost, many also offer free options.[4]
Try well-known streaming services like: Pandora, Apple Music, Spotify, Slacker, and iHeartRadio.[5]
Test out a free trial before purchasing a subscription.

3
Acquire a library card. Whether you’re a bookworm or a casual reader, a library card can save you hundreds on at-home entertainment. Books (paper, audio, or electronic), movies, magazines, newspapers, and music are all available for free or a minimal annual fee. Some libraries even rent out video games or hobby supplies (like cooking tools or board games).[6]
Libraries also offer free community events like children’s read-alongs, book clubs, personal development workshops, or holiday celebrations.

4
Rent video games instead of buying them. You don’t have to shell out your paycheck to get the latest game release; opt for a game rental service to play at a reduced cost. This option is especially ideal if you tend not to replay games and want to avoid reselling for less than the game is worth.[7]
Some services (like Redbox) offer games for a minimal daily fee while others (like Gamefly) operate on a monthly subscription model like movie streaming services.

5
Split entertainment memberships with your loved ones. Share the cost of a music, movie, or video game subscription with a friend or a roommate. If your immediate relatives are interested, some services offer family discounts at a reduced fee.[8]
Many services (like Netflix) allow users to add multiple users without spending more money.[9]
Method Two of Three:
Accessing Local Low-Budget Entertainment

1
Check out student, senior, or other discounts. Many entertainment venues offer special offers for seniors, students, certain club members (like the AAA or AARP) and members of the military. Ask about discount options to see if you qualify for any options.[10]
Talk to your high school or university to learn about student deals offered by local retailers, movie theaters, attractions, or restaurants.
Keep government-issued or student IDs on hand in case you need proof of identification.

2
Choose matinees over evening movies. Going to movies at less-popular times (like Monday afternoons instead of Saturday nights) can save you as much as half the ticket’s cost. If you can wait, avoid seeing movies until they hit the discount theaters to save even more.[11]
Buy your tickets online to receive additional pricing deals or snack coupons.
3
Watch for free community events. Start reading your local newsletters or searching online to catch free city events. Attend free lectures, holiday festivals, concerts, and performances for free or a small cost.[12]
Areas near universities or high schools often have low-cost plays, concerts, and sporting events open to the public.
4
Watch for discount days or happy hours. Some museums, recreation centers, and other public attractions have yearly free or reduced-fee days for the community. Other places (like swimming pools, bowling alleys, or restaurants) have “happy hours” where their prices are reduced daily or weekly during an allotted time. Keep tabs on places you frequent often and ask about upcoming discount opportunities.
5
Buy season passes to your favorite places. If you or your family frequent your city’s zoo, aquarium, museum, or amusement park, buy a season pass. Many season passes cost the amount of visiting two or three times. You might save a bundle each year by paying a little more up front.[13]
6
Volunteer at special events. Volunteering is a fun, meaningful way to serve your community while obtaining free admissions to plays, concerts, or festivals. Theater and music productions often bring on volunteers to usher people in or set-up/break sets afterwards. Contact the venue and ask about volunteering opportunities before you buy your ticket.[14]
Method Three of Three:
Spending Less on Vacation Entertainment
1
Travel during your destination’s off-season. Vacationing during the off-season can help you avoid seasonal tourist traps and save money on attractions. Without a large flow of travelers coming in, some entertainment venues might reduce their admissions costs. You’ll see more of the city’s culture while saving money along the way.[15]
2
Buy event or plane tickets several months in advance. Some companies offer as much as 20% discounts for people who purchase tickets in advance. Once you’ve scheduled your vacation, check how far in advance you can purchase plane or attraction tickets and whether you qualify for discounts.[16]
3
Purchase group deals online. Look for entertainment deals in the city you’re traveling to online. Coupon websites often have group deals available for popular entertainment options. Searching for group deals may help you find cheap entertainment options that you hadn’t considered before.
Popular group deal websites include: Groupon, LivingSocial, TravelZoo, and Local Flavor.[17]
Some vacation apps (like Foursquare or Scoutmob) let vacationers know about city discounts and occasionally offer coupons.[18]
4
Pack plenty of water and snacks. Tourist attractions might escalate the price of food and drinks, so take food with you to save money. Choose snacks that will be easy to eat while walking around or participating in the attraction. Always ask the venue about their policies on bringing outside food in beforehand to avoid throwing anything away.[19]
5
Spend time vacationing outdoors. Don’t forget to spend time outside while traveling, especially since many nature-related activities are free. Check out nearby trails, go on a run or bike ride, or ask locals what their favorite outdoor activities are.[20]
Rent a campsite to save money on lodging.
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wikiHow’s mission is to help people learn, and we really hope this article helped you. Now you are helping others, just by visiting wikiHow.

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Click below to let us know you read this article, and wikiHow will donate to World Possible on your behalf. Thanks for helping us achieve our mission of helping people learn how to do anything.

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Tips
Keep track of every subscription or season pass you buy. Cancel any service that you’re unsatisfied with or use infrequently.
Buy books, video games, or DVDs used to save on at-home entertainment.
If you have a credit card, keep tabs on any points or perks you qualify for to access more entertainment discounts.
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About This Article
Co-authors: 40
Updated: February 22, 2018
Views: 44,431
Article Rating: 100% – 2 votes
Categories: Arts and Entertainment | Keeping Track of Your Spending
Sources and Attribution
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Dec 7, 2016

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HOW TO DRAW ON PICTURES ON ANDROID

Community Tested
How to Draw on Pictures on Android
This wikiHow teaches you how to use draw or paint on a photo using an Android phone or tablet. You’ll need an app like PicsArt Color Paint or You Doodle to get started–you download either for free from the Play Store.

Method One of Two:
Using PicsArt Color Paint

1
Open PicsArt Color Paint. It’s the pink and blue icon with a white “P” in the middle.
If you don’t have PicsArt Color Paint on your Android, you can download it for free from the Play Store  .

2
Tap Start Drawing. It’s the pink button at the bottom-center of the screen.
If you don’t see Start Drawing, tap the left panel with the + at the center to start a new project.

3
Tap the photo icon. It’s the icon that resembles a photo of mountains with a “+” sign at its bottom-left corner. It’s at the top of the screen.
Tap Allow if prompted to give PicsArt permission to access your photos.

4
Scroll down and select a picture to draw on. This will open the picture in editing mode.
You can also tap the camera icon and take a new photo instead.

5
Arrange the photo. Tap and hold in the center of the picture to drag it to a new position. You can also edit and arrange the photo by tapping and dragging on the icons in the photo’s corners:
Ⓧ: Delete the picture.
⤡: Change the picture’s size.
⟲: Rotate the picture.
6
Tap . It’s at the top-right corner. This sets the image in place.
7
Tap the blue color wheel icon. It’s in the toolbar on the bottom-left of the screen. This opens the color picker.
8
Select a color and tap . You can tap a location on the color wheel to select a color and then tap on a location in triangle to adjust that color’s brightness level.
You can also tap a color suggestion at the bottom instead.
9
Tap the paintbrush icon. It’s in the toolbar at the bottom of the screen to the right of the color wheel icon. This opens the brush picker.
10
Select a brush. Swipe through the brush types until you find one you like. You can also adjust the sliders for each brush to change the size or opacity (see-through) of each brush.
You can tap the ^ icon in the top-right corner of the brush selector window to view the brushes full-screen.
Swipe-down on the brush selector to hide it.
11
Draw on your picture. Use your finger to draw on the screen. You can change the color and brushes at any time. You can also use other tools to refine your drawing.
Tap ↩ to undo any mistakes you make.
Tap the eraser tool to erase specific areas.
12
Tap →. It’s in the top-right corner. This takes you to the “Save and Share” page.
13
Tap Gallery. This saves the picture to your Android’s gallery.
Method Two of Two:
Using You Doodle
1
Open You Doodle on your Android. It’s the round icon with a multicolored paint palette inside.
If you don’t have You Doodle on your Android, download it now from the Play Store .
2
Tap Import. It’s at the top of the screen.
3
Tap Draw on Top of Photo. It’s the last option in the menu. A list of sources will appear at the bottom of the screen.
4
Tap your photo gallery icon. If you use Google Photos, tap Photos. Otherwise, look for Gallery or Photo Gallery.
5
Tap the photo you want to draw on. This opens the photo in the crop tool.
6
Crop the photo to the desired size. Drag the corners or edges of the rectangle to surround the part of the photo you want to use, then tap Crop at the top of the screen.
To select the whole photo, tap the first icon (the square with two arrows) at the bottom-left corner of the screen.
If you want to rotate the photo, tap the curved arrow the bottom of the screen.
7
Tap OK. It’s at the top-right corner of the screen. The photo will now open in the drawing editor.
8
Tap the brush icon. It’s at the bottom of the screen. A list of options for your brush will appear.
9
Customize your brush and tap OK. Select either a color or pattern to draw with, and then use the sliders to adjust size and opacity.
Tap Fill to select a single color from the palette, or select one of the pattern options at the top of the screen.
Drag the “Size” slider to the right to increase the brush size, or left to decrease it.
Drag the “Opacity” slider to the left to make the brush color or pattern more see-through, and right to make it more solid/opaque.
10
Use your finger to draw on the picture. If you make a mistake, tap the curved arrow at the bottom-left corner to undo your last action.
11
Tap Export. You will now have the option to save or share your edited photo.
12
Tap Save. A list of file types will appear.
13
Tap your preferred format. Select either PNG or JPG. The quality is similar, but it takes a little longer to save a PNG file.
14
Type a name for your photo and tap OK. This saves your edited photo to your Android’s photo gallery.
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About This Article
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Co-authors: 3
Updated: January 25, 2018
Views: 17,165
Categories: Featured Articles | Android
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