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Download or Watch Avicii Waiting for Love @johnnyblue1

Waiting For Love
Avicii THE LYRICS==>
Where there’s a will, there’s a way, kind of beautiful
And every night has its day, so magical
And if there’s love in this life, there’s no obstacle
That can’t be defeated

For every tyrant a tear for the vulnerable
In every lost soul the bones of a miracle
For every dreamer a dream we’re unstoppable
With something to believe in
Monday left me broken
Tuesday I was through with hoping
Wednesday my empty arms were open
Thursday waiting for love, waiting for love
Thank the stars it’s Friday
I’m burning like a fire gone wild on Saturday
Guess I won’t be coming to church on Sunday
I’ll be waiting for love, waiting for love
To come around
We are one of a kind, irreplaceable
How did I get so blind and so cynical?
If there’s love in this life we’re unstoppable
No we can’t be defeated

Monday left me broken
Tuesday I was through with hoping
Wednesday my empty arms were open
Thursday waiting for love, waiting for love
Thank the stars it’s Friday
I’m burning like a fire gone wild on Saturday
Guess I won’t be coming to church on Sunday
I’ll be waiting for love, waiting for love
To come around
Songwriters: Tim Bergling / Simon Aldred / Salem Al Fakir / Vincent Pontare / Martin Garrix
Waiting For Love lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Universal Music Publishing Group

Waiting for Love” is a song by Swedish DJ and music producer Avicii, produced by Avicii and Dutch producer Martin Garrix and featuring uncredited vocals from Simon Aldred, the former lead singer of English band Cherry Ghost.[3] The track was released on 22 May 2015 as the lead single from Avicii’s second studio album, Stories (2015). The lyrics were also written by Aldred.[4]

“Waiting for Love”
Avicii's Waiting For Love, Cover Artwork.png
Single by Avicii
from the album Stories
Released 22 May 2015
Format
Genre Progressive house[1]
Length
  • 3:48 (radio edit)
  • 5:24 (extended mix)[2]
Label
  • PRMD

Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
  • Avicii

  • Martin Garrix
Avicii singles chronology
The Nights
(2015)
Waiting for Love
(2015)
For a Better Day
(2015)
Music video
“Waiting for Love” on YouTube
“Waiting for Love” (Lyric Video) on YouTube
“Waiting for Love” (360° Video) on YouTube

HistoryEdit

The track was first premiered at Ultra Music Festival 2015 both by Avicii and Dutch electronic producer Martin Garrix. Prior to its release on May 22, 2015, it was thought that the song would have been a full collaboration with Garrix and Bergling, with featuring vocals from John Legend, after several videos and Twitter posts were created stating this collaboration.[5] The singer is confirmed to be Simon Aldred, the lead singer of Cherry Ghost.[3]

CompositionEdit

“Waiting For Love” is a progressive house song written in the key of F minor, follows the chord progression of F#m/C#m/D – D/E/F#m and runs at 128 BPM.[6]

VideosEdit

Music videoEdit

The music video was directed by Sebastian Ringler. It begins with an old man (Sten Elfström) being taken care of by his wife (Ingrid Wallin) who then disappears. Distraught, he leaves home on his mobility scooter to search for her. He roams through the countryside on his scooter, growing as a person and making unlikely friends. He ultimately returns to his home city and is welcomed as a celebrity, as well as discovering his wife waiting for him.[7]

Lyric videoEdit

The lyric video was uploaded on 22 May 2015. It follows the story of a dog and his owner. The owner is sent to war, leaving his dog at home. The dog eventually runs off in search for his master, nearly getting killed by a bomb blast which knocks him out and makes him experience flashbacks of him and his owner when they were younger. The dog soon wakes up and keeps going, eventually finding his owner in the aftermath of a battle, wounded and his left leg missing. The video ends with both (the dog and his master) back home. Directed and edited by Jesper Eriksson and Blackmeal’s CEO Matthieu Colombel, the animation has received a phenomenal response since its release, bringing many to tears, and even inspiring ex-military personnel to thank Avicii for making the video.[8]

360° videoEdit

The 360° video featuring several dancers was published on May 28, 2015 and was directed by Kurt Hugo Schneider.[9] The 360° function of this music video only works with the web browser Google Chrome (for desktop, Android and iOS).[10]

Track listingEdit

Digital download[11]
No. Title Length
1. “Waiting for Love” 3:48

PersonnelEdit

Personnel adapted from CD single.[14]

How to Copyright Your Artwork

How to Copyright Your Artwork
Co-authored by Clinton M. Sandvick, JD, PhD

A work of art is automatically protected by copyright law as soon as it is created, and you are not required to register the work with the U.S. Copyright Office to protect your work.[1] However, registering the work with the U.S. Copyright Office does provide one main benefit—in the event you have to defend your copyright, registration provides an official date on the public record you can point to to justify your copyright-infringement claim. Moreover, you cannot file an infringement suit until your copyright is registered.[2]

Method One of Three:
Registering Your Copyright

1
Prepare your computer to use eCO. Most copyrights can be registered using the U.S. Copyright Office’s electronic registration system, known as eCO. Before using eCO, you will need to make sure your computer is optimized to run eCO in order to avoid technical problems during the registration process. Adjust your settings as follows:[3]:
Disable your browser’s pop-up blocker.
Disable any third-party toolbars.
Set your security and privacy settings to medium.
The U.S. Copyright Office has tested the eCO system using the Firefox browser on the Microsoft Windows 7 Operating System, and advises that other configurations may result in less-than-optimal eCO performance.[4]

2
Familiarize yourself with the eCO process. If you would like an overview of how to use the eCO system to register your copyright, take some time and read through the tutorial presentation offered by the U.S. Copyright Office.[5] The tutorial will walk you through using the eCO system to file your copyright registration.
A number of other sites provide step-by-step instructions on using the eCO system if you don’t like the government’s presentation.

3
Complete the eCO application. After you have familiarized yourself with the process, open the eCO portal and create an account.[6] After doing so, click on “Register a New Claim” on the left-hand side of the welcome page, and follow the prompts to provide the necessary information for your copyright registration.
As you complete the application, the steps on the left-hand side will get checked off. When all sections are checked, your application is ready to send.[7]
When you have entered and reviewed all information for accuracy, click “Add to Cart,” The amount of your filing fee will be displayed on this window. Review the information, and then click “Checkout” to proceed to the payment step.

4
Pay the fee. You have several options for payment. First, you can enter your bank-account information and transfer the required funds electronically.[8] Alternatively, you can pay with a debit/credit card. To do this, you will be directed to Pay.gov, a website operated by the U.S. Treasury Department that handles payment to government agencies.[9]
5
Deposit a copy of your work. The final step in this process is to send in a copy of the work being registered to the U.S. Copyright Office. Generally, you may only deposit a copy through eCO for works that are either (1) unpublished or (2) published only electronically.[10] After paying the fee, click “Continue.” You can upload an electronic copy on the following screen.[11]
If you have to send in a physical copy of your work, click “Create Shipping Slip” on the bottom of this screen, print the slip, attach it to the parcel, and send it to the address listed on the slip.[12]
If you are unsure of the deposit requirements for your particular piece of work, contact the U.S. Copyright Office.[13]
6
Review all correspondence you receive from the Copyright Office immediately. The Copyright Office may contact you by phone or e-mail about your application. If any additional documentation or information is required, you will be notified and should update your registration application as soon as possible.
Check your spam folder to make sure you do not miss anything.
7
Follow up on your registration. To check the status of your application, log in to eCO and click on the blue case number associated with your claim in the “Open Cases” table at the bottom of the screen.
Method Two of Three:
Understanding Copyright Registration
1
Understand the basic steps to register a copyright. Registering a copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office involves three basic steps: (1) complete an application either on paper or using the U.S. Copyright Office’s eCO registration system; (2) paying a fee; and (3) depositing a copy of the work being registered with the U.S. Copyright Office.[14] Once you complete these steps, your copyright will be officially registered.
2
Know which types of work can be registered using eCO. If you can, you will want to use eCO to register your copyright because using this electronic system results in the lowest filing fee, the fastest processing time, the ability to track your submission online, and the ability to deposit certain works directly online without having to mail them in separately (and risk them getting lost, damaged, etc.).[15] You can use eCO to register the following works:[16]
Literary Works
Visual-Arts Works
Performing-Arts Works
Sound Recordings
Motion Picture/Audiovisual Works
Single-Serial Issues (e.g., a single issue of a magazine or newspaper)
For detailed explanations of the above terms, consult the U.S. Copyright Office’s guide explaining the different types of creative works.[17]
3
Determine if your work is published or unpublished. You will only be able to use eCO to register (1) any single work, (2) a collection of unpublished works by the same author, or (3) multiple published works in the same unit of publication (like a book of pictures).[18] The publication status also determines whether or not you will be able to deposit a copy of your work electronically, or if you will have to mail in a copy to the U.S. Copyright Office.
According to copyright law, a work is published if you have sold, rented, leased, or lent the work to the public. It is also considered published if you have offered copies to another party for purpose of further distribution, public performance, or public display.[19]
4
Know your rights. As the owner of a copyright, you have the exclusive right to do, or to authorize someone else to do, the following, subject to specific limitations:[20][21]
Reproduce the work.
Create new works based on the original work by altering it, changing it to another form, or building on it in some way. (These are known as “derivative” works.)
Distribute copies of the work.
Publicly display or perform the work.
5
Learn about additional rights in visual arts. Subject to “fair use”, an author of a work of visual art has additional rights of attribution and integrity, for his or her lifetime, including:
The right to claim authorship and to prevent false attribution of authorship in other works.
The right to prevent attribution of authorship for his or her works that have been mutilated or distorted in ways prejudicial to the reputation of the author.
Certain limited rights to prevent the intentional destruction or mutilation of the work.
Method Three of Three:
Protecting Your Work Online
1
Upload low-resolution images. In the internet age, many artists use the internet to display or promote images of their work. If you plan on doing this, one way to protect against unauthorized use is to only upload low-resolution images of your art.[22] This allows you to promote your work online by showing people what you’ve made, while at the same time preventing less-than-reputable individuals from obtaining clear, full-size copies.
2
Watermark your images. Using an image editor, place a translucent mark identifying the work as yours conspicuously across the image.[23] This way, anyone who obtains a copy will not be able to distribute it or use it freely without everyone who views it knowing where it came from.
You can also consider adding your name to the filename when you upload an image.[24]
There are other technical measures for marking your digital files with searchable markers, and even for preventing any unauthorized copying or distribution, if you are willing to add the necessary restrictions on customer access.
3
Add a copyright notice. You can also obtain a psychological protection of your works by placing a copyright notice on them in a corner or other discrete, yet clearly visible, space. Use the copyright symbol (©), followed by your name and the year the work was created.[25] This should at least serve as a signal that the work is yours, and that you intend to protect it by the copyright that automatically triggered when you created the work.
4
Pursue removal of unauthorized copies. Under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), the owner of a copyright may file an official notice for “takedown” of unauthorized copies being distributed on a server in the USA. The notice is sent to the “registered copyright agent” for the online service provider of the website and they must arrange for timely takedown of the works to avoid being sued.
The online service provider is immune from lawsuit for infringement if they follow the required steps of DMCA.
The works may be restored online if the service provider receives a proper counter-notification from the user who posted the allegedly infringing materials. You would then need to sue the user for a federal restraining order. [26]
5
Register your copyright and sue infringers. Once you have discovered infringement, been unable to get them to stop with warnings and complaints, you may register your copyright (within one month) and sue for damages (including statutory damages), attorneys’ fees, and a permanent injunction. [27]
Community Q&A
Question
I’m a sculptor and I pay a photographer to take photographs of my work which I put on my website. A blogger/critic has used these photographs without permission. Where do I stand?
Community Answer
Contact the blogger and ask about it, if they refuse to take it down and they are not following fair use, consider taking legal action.
Question
How much does it cost to copyright something?
Community Answer
Copyright is free and automatic. Registration is generally not necessary until you want to sue someone in the US courts. Registering costs $35-$55 if you do it by yourself, and $250-$500 if you hire someone to do it.
Question
Can a piece of art be considered original if it was partially copied from another image?
Community Answer
It depends on what and how much of it was copied, and in what context. In some cases, a copyright can be split between you and the creator(s) of the original work.
Question
What is the ideal resolution size for uploading an image or group of images of my art?
Community Answer
Usually 72 dpi, although because computer monitors have much higher resolutions these days, many people are uploading 96 dpi per image in jpg format.
Question
The work to be copyrighted is an original art form/design on a quilt. It is one of a kind. Does a copy have to be made to be submitted? Can a photo of the quilt be submitted?
Upnorth Here
Top Answerer
A photograph may be submitted as a “deposit copy” for works of sculpture or visual arts, among other things.
Question
How do I copyright multiple artworks? Do I have to register and pay the fee for each individual piece?
Upnorth Here
Top Answerer
Each creative work of original authorship is copyrighted the moment you create it in a tangible form. If you are referring to the optional copyright registration, you may register an entire “portfolio” of your own works as a single “title” for a single fee, provided they meet certain criteria. See the eCO FAQ online at copyright.gov for more details.
Tips
If you have any questions about or problems with your copyright registration, contact the U.S. Copyright Office at its toll-free number—(877) 476-0778—between 8:00am and 8:00pm Eastern Standard Time.[28]
The current processing time for copyright registrations filed through eCO is up to 8 months, and the current processing time for paper registrations is up to 13 months.[29]
Generally, a copyright on a US work created and published after 1977 will last for the life of the author, plus an additional 70 years.[30] Determining the duration for works created or published prior to that can be complicated, other than works published in the USA prior to 1923.
If you would prefer to file on paper, use the following forms provided by the U.S. Copyright Office: Form TX for literary works[31], Form VA for visual-arts works[32], Form PA for performing-arts works[33], Form SR for sound recordings[34], and Form SE for single serials.[35] Be sure to read the attached instructions before filling out the form.
Warnings
There is no such thing as a “poor man’s copyright,” which involves placing your work into an envelope and mailing it to yourself, keeping the sealed envelope as “proof” of authorship.[36] This method provides little or no legal protection beyond having the dated copy you already had before you sent it to yourself, proving only that you got bad advice.
Registering a work of art does not provide “blanket protection” for similar creations of yours. For example, if you copyright one piece of art in a series (e.g., one painting of a cityscape in a collection of cityscapes you have painted), only the work you have deposited with the U.S. Copyright Office is protected.[37] You will need to register the others separately. However, you could (in theory) try to argue that an accused infringement is a “derivative work” of your registered version.
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About This Article
Clinton M. Sandvick, JD, PhD
Former Civil Litigator
This article was co-authored by Clinton M. Sandvick, JD, PhD. Clinton M. Sandvick worked as a civil litigator in California for over 7 years. He received his JD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1998 and his PhD in American History from the University of Oregon in 2013.
Categories: Artwork | Copyright Law
Article Summary
References
↑http://copyright.gov/circs/circ40.pdf
↑http://copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf
↑http://www.copyright.gov/eco/tips/
↑http://www.copyright.gov/eco/faq.html#eCO_1.6
↑http://copyright.gov/eco/eco-tutorial-standard.pdf
↑https://eco.copyright.gov/eService_enu/start.swe?SWECmd=Start&SWEHo=eco.copyright.gov
↑http://copyright.gov/eco/eco-tutorial-standard.pdf
↑http://copyright.gov/eco/eco-tutorial-standard.pdf
↑http://copyright.gov/eco/faq.html
More References
Reader Success Stories
A
Anonymous

Jun 29, 2016

“As an artist I am constantly finding people taking pictures of my art and using it for their Facebook profile page…” more
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How to Deal With Motion Sickness on Rides

How to Deal With Motion Sickness on Rides
Co-authored by Laura Marusinec, MD
Updated: March 29, 2019

Motion sickness on amusement parks rides takes the amusement right out of the experience. Our eyes, inner ears, muscles, and joints senses these motion changes and transmits the information to our brain. When the ride begins to rock, these different parts of our bodies send different information, which disorients our brains and leads to queasiness, dizziness, and in the worst situations, projectile vomit. Roller coasters aren’t the only place that this can occur, so the advice for dealing with motion sickness on rides is applicable to boats, trains, planes, and motor vehicles. In order to overcome motion sickness, you can take medication or adjust other aspects of your life that might exacerbate motion sickness, like diet and body position.

Method One of Two:
Taking Medication for Motion Sickness

1
Get some over-the-counter dramamine. Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine, but brand names vary) is an antihistamine drug that can be purchased at most grocery stores and pharmacies. These drugs block receptors in the brain associated with nausea and vomiting. You can purchase dramamine in two tablet forms — drowsy and non-drowsy. Non-drowsy is best for amusement parks. If you are taking a train or a plane long distance and can sleep, the drowsy kind will work well.
To prevent motion sickness, the first dose should be taken 30 minutes to one hour before you go to the amusement park. Adults and children older than age 12 can usually take dimenhydrinate every four to six hours as needed to prevent or treat motion sickness. Children under 12 can usually be given dimenhydrinate every six to eight hours or as needed to prevent or treat motion sickness, but talk to your child’s doctor before using medications on young children.
There are a few other similar medications used for motion sickness. check with your doctor or pharmacist on which medication may be best for you.

2
Acquire a scopolamine patch. You’ll need to see a doctor to get a prescription for this medication. Generally, this medication is saved for those who aren’t helped by dramamine. Most of the time, scopolamine is administered in a patch form.
Talk to your doctor about potential side effects of this medication, which can include drowsiness, disorientation, dry mouth, or hallucinations.[1]
People with glaucoma or certain other medical problems may not be able to use scopolamine, so make sure to tell your doctor about any medical problems you have.
3
Apply a scopolamine patch. The patch should be applied as directed on the package. Normally, it should be placed on the back of the ear, at least four hours prior to when it is actually needed. Wash behind your ear before applying. Remove the patch from the protective packaging. Place on the skin. Wash your hands thoroughly afterwards. Leave on for as long as you need it or as long as the package prescribes.[2]
4
Try some ginger supplements. Ginger (zingiber officinale) is cheap and effective. You can consume ginger raw or in lozenge/pill form. You can purchase ginger at any grocery store or pharmacy.
If you want to take raw ginger before you get on a ride, just peel it and dice it into a small cube. Picture a piece of gum and try to make your raw ginger resemble that size. Know that many find the aftertaste of ginger to be pungent and generally unpleasant. If this is you, choose the pill or lozenge form.[3]
Method Two of Two:
Riding Strategically to Avoid Motion Sickness
1
Eat something to settle your stomach. Either before you get on the ride or when you get off the ride, find somewhere to eat something that will soothe your stomach, like crackers or ginger ale. Bland food, high in carbohydrates and low in fats are best for motion sickness. Eat foods with ginger in them or breads, cereals, grains, or fruits.[4]
Spicy and acidic foods can irritate the stomach lining, making your whole system more susceptible to problems.[5]
2
Sit in the most stable part of the ride. Depending on the vehicle, this will change. Generally, the most stable part of a roller coaster is the middle. The back and front of the ride tend to whip around more than the middle. In cars, the most stable part is the front seat. On boats and planes, the most stable part is the middle again.[6]
3
Keep your head and neck straight. Since motion sickness is often caused by conflicting signals from various parts of your body, try to keep your head and neck straight at all times. By keeping your body in a straight line, you’ll keep your head from bouncing around more. On roller coasters, this is especially important if you want to avoid head and neck injuries.[7]
4
Keep your eyes on a fixed point. You are more likely to get dizzy if your eyes are swirling around in front of you. Keep your eyes on a fixed point wherever you are. If you are on a roller coaster, it helps to stare at the car in front of you or simply to close your eyes. If you are on a boat, stare at the horizon. This will reduce sea-sickness.[8]
5
Reduce your activity. Simplicity is best for motion sickness. Obviously, this doesn’t really apply to amusement park rides, where multitasking is nearly impossible. But on planes, trains, boats, or in cars, try to do less. Stop reading your book or watching a movie. Just sit back and relax to cure motion sickness.[9]
6
Apply pressure to your P6 point. The acupuncture point known as Pericardium 6 is said to relieve general nausea. It is on the inside of the wrist, a little more than an inch up the arm from the center of the wrist crease. Many travel stores sell wristbands with built in buttons that apply pressure to this point. Scientific studies have shown the effectiveness of this method on motion sickness.[10]
There is still some debate as to whether the pressure point or the act of pressing the point helps reduce nausea.[11] Either way, give it a try.
Community Q&A
Question
I am going to the fair with some friends, and every time I ride a ride or even look at a fast ride, I get dizzy and my stomach starts to turn. How do I prevent that?
M. Jacqueline
Community Answer
A way to relieve tension from your stomach is to scream instead of holding your breath. You can also ask others about their experiences or ride with friends. Don’t watch the ride while you are in line or walking past it. You can also think of something funny to get your mind off of it.
Question
One of my friends was sick after the Rampage. She said she didn’t have motion sickness and was fine before. She was vomiting after. Any ideas why she was unwell?
M. Jacqueline
Community Answer
It most likely was because she ate something before the ride or because of the twists and turns. The intensity of the ride could have caused it.
Question
What are some types of roller coasters I should avoid if I don’t want to get sick?
Community Answer
Don’t start off with the fastest or tallest roller coasters as those can sometimes cause motion sickness. Also, avoid roller coasters that have a lot of loops or quick jerks/turns.
Question
I am going to Adventure Island with my school as a trip. I suffer from motion sickness, how can I avoid vomiting?
Community Answer
Dramamine. It’s an over the counter medication for motion sickness, and I’ve found it works pretty well. There may be a non-name brand version as well, I’m not sure. As usual, read the label and follow the directions.
Question
I just got off a ride, how do I stop my nausea?
Nat8703
Community Answer
Find a nearby bench and sit down for a bit. Take a few deep breaths and congratulate yourself that you successfully rode the ride. Think about how the ride was so much fun and that it was worth it. Before you know it, your nausea will be gone.
Question
How can I prevent puking after getting off a roller-coaster?
Community Answer
Don’t be nervous and remember everything is okay. One thing that helps is closing your eyes, and squeeze the bars as tight as you want to.
Question
I heard that there’s types of food I can eat to prevent nausea and motion sickness before riding a ride. What foods are best?
Community Answer
Try ginger or crackers. If you are at an amusement park or even on the go, you can also try drinking a sports drink like Gatorade. Water can help some people, but can also make others vomit.
Question
What do I do if I feel like the world is shaking after I ride a ride?
Community Answer
Try medication beforehand, or afterwards sit out for a bit and take some deep breaths. This also could be because of the intensity of the ride; either don’t ride it or sit in the most stable part.
Question
Can I take Dramamine if I am pregnant?
Community Answer
Yes, Dramamine is safe for expectant mothers.
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About This Article
Laura Marusinec, MD
Doctor of Medicine
This article was co-authored by Laura Marusinec, MD. Dr. Marusinec is a Board Certified Pediatrician in Wisconsin. She received her M.D. from the Medical College of Wisconsin School of Medicine in 1995.
Categories: Motion Sickness | Amusement and Theme Parks
Article Summary
References
↑https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a682509.html
↑http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a682509.html
↑http://www.motion-sickness-guru.com/ginger-for-motion-sickness.html
↑http://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/healthy_living/hic_Steps_to_Staying_Well/hic_Travel_Medical_Kit/hic_What_You_Need_to_Know_about_Seasickness-or-motion-sickness
↑http://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/healthy_living/hic_Steps_to_Staying_Well/hic_Travel_Medical_Kit/hic_What_You_Need_to_Know_about_Seasickness-or-motion-sickness
↑http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2060606-clinical
↑http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41-s1.html
↑Tal D, et al. Artificial Horizon Effects on Motion Sickness and Performance. Otology & Neurotology. 33:878.2012.
↑. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41-s1.html
More References
Reader Success Stories
BO
Brianna Olivas

Feb 1, 2017

“I have suffered from motion sickness on amusement rides, on boats, and in cars for years. I have found sitting in…” more
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