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How To Find the Equation of a Line

How to Find the Equation of a Line
Co-authored by Grace Imson, MA
Updated: December 19, 2019
Finding the equation for a line is a common problem in geometry and trigonometry. There are two common situations where you are asked to find the equation for a line: either you’ll be provided with one point on the line and the slope of the line, or you’ll be provided two points on the line. In either case, finding the equation for that line isn’t difficult, provided you use the correct formula and work carefully.

Method 1 of 2:
Calculating the Equation with One Point and the Slope

1
Plug the slope in for m in the formula y-y1 = m(x-x1). This is known as the point-slope formula. The point-slope formula uses the slope and the coordinates of a point along the line to find the y-intercept. Use the slope in place of m in y-y1 = m(x-x1).[1]
For example, if you know the slope of the line is 2, then your formula will look like this: y-y1 = 2(x-x1).
EXPERT TIP

GRACE IMSON, MA
Math Instructor, City College of San Francisco
Our Expert Agrees: When you’re given two points to solve for the equation of the line, the first thing you have to find is the slope of the line. To get that, subtract the vertical coordinates, then divide that by the difference in the horizontal coordinates.

2
Replace x1 and y1 with the coordinates of the point. Use the coordinates you’re given as (x1, y1). Put the numbers in the corresponding spot on your formula before you start solving the equation.[2]
For example, if you know the coordinate is (4, 3), your formula will read: y-3 = 2(x-4).

3
Solve the formula for y to get the final slope-intercept formula. Follow the mathematical order of operations and the distributive property to remove the x-term from parenthesis.
In our example, first you’d use the distributive property to get y-3=2x-8.
Then, add 3 to each side so y is by itself.
The final equation for a line in slope-intercept form with a slope of 2 that contains the point (4, 3) is y = 2x-5.
Method 2 of 2:
Finding the Equation Using Two Points

1
Find the slope using m = (y2-y1)/(x2-x1). The ordered pairs of the coordinates you have are listed as (x, y). Use the first set of coordinates as (x1, y1) and the second set as (x2, y2). Plug the numbers into the formula m = (y2-y1)/(x2-x1) and solve for m.[3]
For example, if your coordinates are (3, 8) and (7, 12), the formula would read: m = (12-8)/(7-3) = 4/4 = 1. In this case, your slope, or m, equals 1.

2
Replace the m in the slope-intercept formula with the slope you found. The slope-intercept formula of a line is written as y = mx+b, where m is the slope and b is the y-intercept (the point on the y-axis where the line crosses it). Plug the number you found for your slope in place of m.[4]
In our example, the formula would read y = 1x+b or y = x+b when you replace the slope value.
3
Substitute x and y for one of the points you know to solve for the y-intercept. Pick one of the ordered pairs to put into the slope-intercept formula. Put the x-value in place of x and the y-value in place of y.[5]
In this example, if you chose (3, 8) as your coordinates, then the formula would read 8 = 1(3)+b.
4
Solve the equation for b. Once you plug the x- and y-values as well as your slope into the formula, find the value of b in the equation. Follow the order of operations first before moving the rest of the numbers to the other side. Leave b on one side of the equation to solve it.[6]
In our example, the formula currently reads 8 = 1(3)+b. Multiply 1 and 3 together to get 8 = 3+b. Since 3 is a positive number, subtract 3 from each side to isolate b. This leaves you with 5 = b, or b = 5.
5
Plug in the slope and y-intercept into the slope-intercept formula to finish the equation. Once you’re finished, plug in the slope for m and the y-intercept for b. After that, you’ve found the equation for the line.
For example, the equation for the line with points on (3, 8) and (7, 12) is y = 1x+5 or simply y = x+5.
Community Q&A
Question
How do I find an intercept of a line?
Donagan
Top Answerer
Using the equation, set x equal to zero and solve for y to find the y-intercept, or set y equal to zero and solve for x to find the x-intercept.
Question
What should I do with a negative y?
Community Answer
You multiply the whole equation by -1 to remove the negative sign. For example, if the question is: -y=-5x+1, you would then change the question to: -y*(-1) = (-5x+1)*(-1), and then get: y=5x-1.
Question
What about given a slope and an intercept in y?
Donagan
Top Answerer
Express the equation in standard form, y = mx + b, where m is the slope, and b is the y-intercept.
Question
The teacher wants me to write the equation of a line. If the gradient is 3 and the y intercept is -5, is the equation y = 3x + -5?
Donagan
Top Answerer
Yes, y = 3x – 5.
Question
What if my parallel line is the y-axis?
Donagan
Top Answerer
That means the line you’re looking for would be defined as x = b: the line is vertical, m is “undefined” (infinity), and b is the x-intercept.
Question
How do I find whether a point (coordinate) falls on a line?
Donagan
Top Answerer
Take the x- and y-coordinates of the point, and insert them into the equation of the line. If the equation holds true with those x and y values inserted, the point is on the line.
Question
How do I find a parallel line?
Donagan
Top Answerer
Assuming a given straight line in the form of mx + b, any parallel line would have the same form with the same “m” but a different “b.”
Question
How would I solve a system with only one given point?
Donagan
Top Answerer
A “system” consists of at least two different equations (and thus at least two lines on a graph). As the above article explains, two pieces of information are required in order to define a line: a point and a slope. To “solve a system with only one given point,” the point would have to be the intersection of the lines, and you would then need each line’s slope.
Question
What about one point and no slope?
Donagan
Top Answerer
As the above article explains, two pieces of information are required in order to define a straight line: the line’s slope and a point on the line. If you don’t know the slope, you could have an infinite number of lines passing through a given point.
Question
How would I find a line’s equation if I know one point on the line and have the equation for another parallel line?
Community Answer
You would take the slope from that line and use the above example to use the given point and the slope to figure out which point would be the slope the line would go through.
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About This Article
Grace Imson, MA
Math Instructor, City College of San Francisco
This article was co-authored by Grace Imson, MA. Grace Imson is a math teacher with over 40 years of teaching experience. Grace is currently a math instructor at the City College of San Francisco and was previously in the Math Department at Saint Louis University. She has taught math at the elementary, middle, high school, and college levels. She has an MA in Education, specializing in Administration and Supervision from Saint Louis University.
Co-authors: 58
Updated: December 19, 2019
Views: 715,241
Article Rating: 91% – 21 votes
Categories: Featured Articles | Coordinate Geometry
Article Summary
References
↑http://www.coolmath.com/algebra/08-lines/11-finding-equation-line-point-slope-01
↑http://www.coolmath.com/algebra/08-lines/11-finding-equation-line-point-slope-01
↑http://www.coolmath.com/algebra/08-lines/12-finding-equation-two-points-01
↑https://www.mathwarehouse.com/algebra/linear_equation/write-equation/equation-of-line-given-two-points.php
↑https://www.mathwarehouse.com/algebra/linear_equation/write-equation/equation-of-line-given-two-points.php
↑https://www.mathwarehouse.com/algebra/linear_equation/write-equation/equation-of-line-given-two-points.php
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HOW-TO; How to Remove Under Eye Milia

How to Remove Under Eye Milia

Milia look a bit like whitehead pimples, but they’re actually small cysts caused by trapped bits of the protein keratin. They’re nearly always completely harmless medically, but having them under your eyes—which is a common spot for milia—can be quite frustrating due to how they look. While it’s generally fine to just let the milia go away on their own, you can try an under-eye routine that may help speed the process along. For more immediate removal options, contact your primary care doctor or dermatologist.

Method One of Three:
Following an Under-Eye Routine

1
Wash your face with a gentle cleanser once or twice per day. Splash your face with lukewarm water, then gently massage in a small amount of a hypoallergenic facial cleanser. Rinse the cleanser away with cool water, then pat your face dry with a soft cloth.[1]
The best time to wash your face is in the evening before going to bed. You can also wash in the morning, especially if your dermatologist recommends it. Alternatively, you might just use lukewarm water and a clean cloth to gently wipe your face in the morning.

2
Use steam from the shower or sink to soften your skin. Do this after washing your face. If you showered, let the steam build up in your bathroom and hang out in there for 5-10 minutes. Or, fill the sink with hot water, lean your face over it, and drape a towel over your head for 5-10 minutes.[2]
Milia aren’t caused by clogged pores, but letting the steam open your pores may make it easier to exfoliate dead skin cells covering the milia.
Steam also softens your skin, which makes exfoliating a bit easier.

3
Gently exfoliate under your eyes with a warm, damp, soft cloth. After you’re done with your steam treatment, run a clean cloth under warm water and squeeze out the excess. Rub the area under your eyes gently for 1-2 minutes, using a circular motion and light pressure. Rinse your face with cool water, then pat it dry with a clean towel.[3]
Don’t rub so hard that you cause redness or discomfort. Your goal is to remove dead skin cells from the area of the milia, not to try to rub the milia off!
Exfoliate every other day, unless your dermatologist recommends doing so more or less frequently.

4
Apply a natural remedy like honey or rose water, if desired. Both honey and rose water have antimicrobial properties and may potentially encourage milia to disappear more quickly. For a simple honey mask, apply a small amount of honey beneath your eyes, let it sit for 15 minutes, then wipe it away completely with lukewarm water and a soft cloth.[4]
Alternatively, you can make honey masks with ingredients like turmeric, almond oil, aloe vera, or oatmeal.
For a rose water face mask, mix together spoonfuls of plain yogurt and honey, then stir in a few drops of rose water. As with a plain honey face mask, leave it on your face for 15 minutes before wiping it away.
There’s no real evidence that natural masks like these will help get rid of milia, but they’re also very unlikely to cause any problems.

5
Conceal the milia with hypoallergenic makeup if you wish. If you want to hide the milia while you treat them, use a lightweight, hypoallergenic makeup that won’t clog your pores or cake over your skin cells. Remove the makeup completely when you wash your face in the evening.[5]
Small amounts of concealing makeup shouldn’t impact how long the milia will last. Caking on heavy amounts of makeup may cause the milia to stick around longer, though.
Method Two of Three:
Consulting a Dermatologist

1
Don’t pick, poke, or try to remove milia, especially near your eyes. You can’t “pop” milia like pimples (which you shouldn’t do anyway), and trying to do so may break the skin and cause an infection or scarring. While it’s possible to remove milia yourself with a sterilized needle, tweezers, and comedone extractor, you should definitely never try this with any milia that are anywhere near your eyes.[6]
The risk of injuring your eye with a sharp instrument is simply too great to risk.
Think twice before trying to remove milia that aren’t near your eyes. Even if you properly sterilize your tools to reduce the risk of infection, there’s still a chance you’ll cause scarring. It’s always safer to see have a doctor remove milia.
2
Apply an OTC topical medication with your doctor’s approval. Do this if you prefer a medical treatment to a natural mask. It’s always best to consult your dermatologist or primary care doctor before using any of the numerous over-the-counter options available. They’ll help you choose the right option for your specific needs and avoid potential drug interactions or side effects.[7]
Only use treatments that are specifically labeled for use near the eyes. Even then, be extra careful not to get any of the medication into your eyes.
These topical treatments often include one of the following ingredients: alpha hydroxy acids; salicylic acid; retinol.
3
Treat milia with prescribed topical retinoids. Talk to a dermatologist about the option of treating the milia with topical retinoids. Topical means a cream or a gel that you put on top of your skin, rather than a medicine that you ingest. If your doctor prescribes topical retinoids, you will most likely have to apply the retinoid to the milia every day for several weeks.[8]
Retinoid is the active form of vitamin A.
Keep in mind that this is purely cosmetic, since milia aren’t actually harmful, so you could just wait for them to go away.
4
Undergo “deroofing” or similar mechanical removal techniques. Your primary care doctor or dermatologist will likely remove milia using a process called “deroofing.” They’ll create a tiny slice in your skin right next to each milia, then use a comedone extractor and/or tweezers to draw and pull the milia out through the skin opening.[9]
This is an extremely delicate procedure when done anywhere near the eyes. Always leave it to the professionals, or simply leave the milia alone.[10]
5
Discuss alternate treatments like cryotherapy or laser ablation. Milia can, in some cases, be removed using methods other than manual extraction. These are less likely when the milia are near your eyes, out of concern for any accidents that may cause eye damage. Alternate treatments may include:[11]
Cryotherapy, in which the milia are frozen off with a small, specialized tool.
Laser ablation, which essentially “zaps” the milia away with a targeted beam of light.
Method Three of Three:
Focusing on Patience and Prevention
1
Leave milia alone if they don’t bother you physically or emotionally. Unless they get infected, most likely due to you scratching or picking at them, milia are completely harmless physically. Therefore, leaving them alone is nearly always the appropriate medical recommendation. They’ll usually go away on their own within 2 weeks to 6 months.[12]
However, if having prominent milia under your eyes (or elsewhere) is causing you emotional distress, it’s reasonable to have them removed for your own wellbeing. Let your doctor know if this is the case for you.
2
Don’t worry about milia on newborns or infants. Roughly half of all babies develop at least some milia on their faces during their first 6 months of life. It’s not clear exactly why this happens, but it’s completely normal and nearly always completely harmless. The milia will almost certainly go away on their own by around 6 months of age.[13]
Never try to remove milia from a baby yourself, and don’t expect to find a legitimate doctor who will do so either. The only reason a doctor might consider removing milia is if they are red, swollen, and possibly infected.
3
Take care of your skin to possibly reduce the likelihood of getting milia. There’s no guaranteed way to prevent milia, but being kind to your skin may lower your chances. Proper skin care may also reduce your risk of acne and more serious conditions like skin cancer. In addition to an under-eye cleaning, steaming, and exfoliating routine, take steps like:[14]
Applying sunscreen whenever you go outdoors.
Wearing a broad-brimmed hat to keep the sun off your face.
Removing makeup thoroughly at bed time.
Contacting your doctor regarded the appropriate treatment for any abrasions or minor burns on your skin. Milia can sometimes occur in the area of healing skin.
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Get Rid of Milia
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Heal over Exfoliated Skin
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Get Clear Skin Using Home Remedies
About This Article
Erik Kramer, DO, MPH
Doctor of Osteopathy
This article was co-authored by Erik Kramer, DO, MPH. Dr. Erik Kramer is a Primary Care Physician at the University of Colorado, specializing in weight management, diabetes, and internal medicine. He received his Doctorate in Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) from the Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2012. Dr. Kramer is a Diplomate of the American Board of Obesity Medicine and is board certified.
Co-authors: 5
Updated: October 22, 2019
Views: 390
Article Rating: 100% – 2 votes
Categories: Featured Articles | Skin Care
References
↑https://www.healthline.com/health/milia-under-eyes
↑https://www.healthline.com/health/milia-under-eyes
↑https://www.healthline.com/health/milia-under-eyes
↑https://www.healthline.com/health/milia-under-eyes
↑https://www.healthline.com/health/milia-under-eyes
↑https://hscweb3.hsc.usf.edu/dermatology/what-are-milia-and-how-do-you-get-rid-of-them/
↑https://www.healthline.com/health/milia-under-eyes
↑https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/133/5/e1373
↑https://www.healthline.com/health/milia-under-eyes
More References
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How to Make Jewelry with Wire

Wire is used to make chains and findings for many types of jewelry. The strength, flexibility, and natural beauty of wire also makes it perfect for creating beautiful embellishments on beaded jewelry or pendants. Some artfully wrapped or woven wire can also stand alone as an elegant piece. Master the basics of wire wrapping and wire weaving, and you’ll soon be able to create an array of gorgeous wire jewelry.

Method One of Four:
Selecting Your Materials

1
Get a set of jewelry pliers and cutters. For most basic wire jewelry projects, you will need a set of wire cutters, some round-nosed pliers, and some chain-nosed pliers. You can purchase these tools at most arts and crafts stores or jewelry and beading supply stores.[1]
Other useful tools include bent-nosed pliers for fine detail work and flat-edged pliers for making sharp angles in your wire.

2
Pick the wire color and material you like best. The most common colors for jewelry wire are silver, gold, or copper, but you can also get color-coated wire in every imaginable shade. Different types of wire also have different properties, so keep this in mind when making your selection.
Base-metal wires (such as copper or stainless steel) or alloys (like brass or nickel silver) are relatively inexpensive. These are good options when you are still learning to work with wire.
Popular precious metal jewelry wire materials include sterling silver, gold, and gold-filled (an alloy with a gold coating). Sterling silver tends to tarnish, while gold does not. Gold is softer and easier to dent or scratch, however.
Memory wire retains its coiled shape, so it’s great for making simple beaded bracelets or chokers.
3
Purchase wire in a variety of gauges. Depending on the piece you are making, you may need thicker or thinner wire, or a combination of thicknesses. The lower the gauge number of the wire, the thicker it is. High-gauge wires are good for elaborate coils and weaves, while low-gauge wire is best for sturdier elements like links and clasps.[2]
For example, you might use a 28-gauge wire for a delicate wire crochet bracelet. If you wanted to make a heavy-duty clasp for a necklace, 10-gauge would be a better bet.
4
Choose harder wire for the best shape retention. Most jewelry wire comes in 3 different levels of hardness: dead soft, half hard, and full hard. Softer wires are easier to bend than harder wires, but do not hold their shape as well as harder wires.[3]
Dead soft wire is best for delicate work that requires a lot of flexibility, such as wire weaving or wire crochet. The wire will naturally begin to stiffen as you work with it.
Dead soft wire can also be useful for making findings or other elements from very thick wire that would otherwise be difficult to shape. When you’re done, you can tap all over the finished wire shape a few times with a rubber mallet on a steel plate to harden (temper) it.
Full hard wire is difficult to bend and can snap easily if you stress it too much. It is the best at retaining its shape, however.
Half hard wire is relatively easy to shape and also retains its shape well. This kind of wire is good for creating sturdy links and load-bearing elements.
5
Buy prefabricated findings to make your projects easier. Jewelry findings are elements like clasps, connectors, chains, and pins. You can purchase findings in arts and crafts or jewelry supply stores. You can incorporate pre-made findings into your hand-made pieces to add extra flair and make your job a little easier.
For example, you can make a unique necklace by attaching beads to a prefabricated chain with wrapped wire links.
Decorative chandelier earring findings make great bases for elegant wire-wrapped bead earrings.[4]
Method Two of Four:
Creating Basic Wire Links
1
Select a medium-gauge wire. Since links are load-bearing elements, you’ll need a wire that is thick enough to be relatively sturdy. A 20-gauge half-hard wire is typically a good choice.[5] Using half hard wire (as opposed to dead soft) can also help strengthen your links.
If you’re using beads, make sure the wire is thin enough to go through the drill holes. For very tiny beads, you may need a higher gauge.
2
Snip off the very end of the wire with the flush side of your cutters. Take the length of wire you are working with and clip off a very small amount of wire from the end to make a flat edge. The flat (flush) edge of the wire clippers should face the length of wire you will be working with (rather than the end you are snipping off).[6] You will be using this flat end of the wire to make your loop.
If you like, you can make your loop in the wire while it is still on the roll, or you can cut off a longer length of wire (e.g., around 12 inches (30 cm)) to work with. If you do cut a piece off the roll, don’t cut it too short, or you may end up without enough wire to make your link.
If you’re making a loop at the end of a prefabricated finding, such as a head pin, you probably will not need to cut off any of the wire.
3
Pinch the end of the wire with your round-nosed pliers. Gently grasp the very end of the wire between the ends of your pliers. The wire should be flush with the pliers, so that you can’t see the end extending beyond the pliers when you look at them in profile.[7]
Round-nosed pliers have tapered ends, so position the end of the wire closer to the base if you want a bigger loop and nearer to the tip if you want a tighter loop.
Take care not to squeeze the wire too tightly, or you may dent it. You only need to exert enough pressure to hold the wire in place.
4
Roll the end of the wire away from you gently to form a loop. Once the wire is securely in place, turn the hand holding the pliers away from you so that the wire begins to wrap around one of the jaws of the pliers. Press the wire against the pliers with the thumb of your free hand as you do this. Once you’ve turned your wrist as far as it will go, reposition the pliers within the loop so that you can turn them again. Do this until you have a complete loop.[8]
When you reposition the pliers, make sure the wire is still about the same distance from the base of the pliers as it was when you started. Otherwise, your loop will be a little misshapen.
5
Rock the loop back with the round-nose pliers to center the loop. When you’re done wrapping the wire around the jaw of the pliers, you should have a “p” shape. In order to center the loop over the end of the wire, insert one of the jaws into the loop and gently pinch the wire right at the base of the loop. Grip the wire tightly at the base of the loop with your free hand and use the pliers to bend the wire back slightly so that the loop is centered over the length of the wire like the dot of an “i.”[9]
If your wire is too thick to bend into place with the round-nose pliers, you may need to use chain-nose pliers instead.
6
Use your chain-nose pliers to close the loop. After you complete the loop, there may be a small gap between the end of the loop and the rest of the wire. Grip the end of the loop with your chain-nose pliers and gently work it back and forth while pushing in until the gap is closed.[10]
Don’t try to squeeze the sides of the loop together from the outside, or you will end up with a squashed loop!
7
Make a wrapped loop for extra security. For a completely closed loop with a slightly fancier appearance, use your chain-nose pliers to make a 90° bend in the wire about 2 inches (5.1 cm) from the end. Make a loop as you normally would just above the bend, this time leaving a “tail” that extends beyond the wire at a 90° angle. Wind the tail tightly around the wire below the bend 3-4 times.[11]
When you’re done, use your cutters to snip off any remaining tail. You can tighten the wrap by gently squeezing it at the top and bottom with your chain-nose pliers or your fingernails.
This technique is easiest to do when you already have a bead on the wire. Grip the wire just above the bead when you make your 90° bend. This will leave a few millimeters of space between the bead and the loop around which to wrap the tail.
You will not be able to open this loop once it is complete, so you’ll need to attach it to an element you can open, such as a simple loop or a jump ring.
8
String one or more beads on the wire if you like. If you wish, you can slide a bead onto the wire and then make a second loop on the other side. This way, you can link several beads together. You could also drop a bead onto a flat-ended head pin and make a loop above the bead. You can then add the bead to a chain or ear hook as a charm or bangle.
Check online or in beading books or magazines for design inspirations using simple wire loops or wrapped links.
Method Three of Four:
Making Simple Wire-Wrapped Pendants
1
Select a stone or other object to wrap. You can use just about anything—like a tumbled stone, a crystal, a piece of sea glass, a coin, or even a shell or shark tooth. For this project, you will be making a basket or cage around the object with wire to create a pendant that you can hang on a necklace.
Objects that are somewhat irregularly shaped and widest in the middle are easiest to wrap using this technique.
Most wrapped pendants are not much longer than about 2 inches (5.1 cm), but you are free to wrap a bigger object if you wish. Keep in mind that larger objects will need more wire to wrap them than smaller ones.
2
Cut 2 equal lengths of medium-gauge wire. Choose a jewelry wire that is around 20-22 gauge and half hard. Since the wire will need to support the weight of the pendant, it’s best to choose a relatively sturdy wire. The length you need will depend on the size of your pendant, but 6–8 inches (15–20 cm) is usually enough.[12]
Snip the wires with the flush side of a wire clipper so that you get nice, clean cuts.
If you’re still practicing with wire wrapping, you may wish to use copper or another base metal rather than a more expensive precious metal wire.
For heavier pendants, consider using thicker wire (e.g., 18 gauge instead of 20) to fully support their weight.
3
Twist the 2 wires together 5 times, starting in the middle. Make an “X” with the 2 wires, making sure they intersect right in the middle of both wires. Pinch the wires where they cross with the index finger and thumb of each hand and give them 5 firm twists, turning your hands in opposite directions.[13]
Make sure that the wires are both twisting and that you are not just wrapping one wire around the other.
4
Pull the wires straight on both sides of the twist. When you’re done twisting, you’ll have an X-shape with a twist in the middle. Pull the wire legs straight and parallel to each other at a roughly 90° angle from the twist to create an “H.”[14]
You can straighten the wires by pulling them between your fingers in the desired direction.
You’ll be repeating this process several times as you make the pendant.
5
Lay the twisted section on one side of your pendant. Choose the side that you wish to be either the front or back of your pendant and lay the twisted part of the wire flat against it. The twist should be oriented straight up and down and positioned roughly halfway between the top and bottom of the pendant.[15]
Once the twist is in place, press the wires down along the surface of the pendant so that they follow the pendant’s shape around to the opposite side.
6
Repeat the twist on the 2 wires at the bottom of the pendant. Take the 2 lower wires and make a second twist on the opposite side of the pendant from the first one. Do 5 turns, straighten the wires, and push the new twist up so it lies flat against the pendant.[16]
The new twist will sit approximately opposite the first one. You should now have a ring in which the bottom of the pendant can securely rest.
7
Continue to make twists until you reach the top of the pendant. Grab one of the pairs of wires above your first 2 twists and make a new twist. Lay it flat against the pendant as you did before. Keep doing this on both sides until the entire pendant is contained, all the way to the top.[17]
Your pendant should now be in a wire “cage” with 4 loose wires at the top.
Adjust the cage as you go so that your pendant fits into it securely. You can do this by occasionally pushing the stone flush against the twists that you have already made and pulling the wires taut.
8
Grab 2 of the wires at the top of the cage and twist them together. Select one of the remaining pairs of wires and give it 5 twists, but this time do not lay the wires flat against your pendant. Instead, leave them sticking straight up.[18]
This is the first step to creating the bail, which is the ring you will use to hang your pendant.
9
Wrap each of the remaining 2 wires around the final twist. Take each of the 2 free wires, one at a time, and wind each one around the vertical twist 5 times or until you reach the top of the twist. When you’re done, snip off the ends with your wire cutters.[19]
Wind these wires slowly and carefully to make a strong, tight coil. If you wish, you can use chain nose pliers for greater control.
It may help to draw the stray end of each wire taut with your pliers before snipping it off. Use the pliers to pinch down any ends that are sticking up after you snip the wires.
10
Wind the top 2 wires around a pencil to create a loop. Straighten out the wires at the top of the twist so they are at a 90° angle to the twist, forming a “T” shape. Place a pencil or other object with a round cross-section (such as the jaw of a pair of round-nose pliers) at the top of the twist and wrap the 2 wires around it in opposite directions to create a nice, round loop.[20]
Make sure the 2 wires of your loop are tightly wrapped and close together.
11
Wind the remaining wire around the twist to secure the bail. Once you’re satisfied with your bail, take the ends of the 2 wires and wrap them 2 or 3 times around the twist. Be sure to make your wraps nice and tight. Remove the pencil when you’re done, and you should have a secure bail for your pendant![21]
When you’re done, snip off the ends of the wires and flatten them down with your chain-nose pliers.
For a fancier look, make a small loop at the end of each wire with the very tip of your round-nose pliers. Use the chain-nose pliers to wind each wire into a spiral, then flatten the spirals against the base of the twist on each side.
Method Four of Four:
Doing a Basic 2-Wire Weave
1
Select some medium wire (16-20 gauge) and fine wire (24-26 gauge). The thicker wire will form the backbone of your weave (the warp), and you will wrap the thinner wire around it.[22] While your thicker wire should ideally be half-hard, dead soft wire is ideal for the woven elements.
Since it takes some practice to get the hang of wire weaving, you may wish to start with copper or some other relatively inexpensive wire.
2
Cut 2 pieces of medium wire to the desired length. The length you’ll need will depend on the project you’re working on. For example, if you’re making a simple woven ring, about 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) is a good length.[23]
If you wish, you can use the fine weaving wire while it is still on the roll. Otherwise, cut off a long length (at least 12 inches (30 cm) so that you have plenty to work with.
3
Lay the 2 warp wires parallel to each other on your work surface. You can put them as close together or far apart as you wish, depending on the look you want to achieve.[24] Keep in mind that you will use up more weaving wire to cover any given length if your warp wires are farther apart.
If you wish, you can tape down the ends of your warp wires on one side with masking tape to hold them in place. You could also hold them between your fingers or keep them in place with a ring clamp.[25]
The wires don’t have to be exactly parallel. You can create an interesting effect by angling the 2 warp wires slightly apart or curving one or both of them so that the weave is wider in some places than others.[26]
4
Coil the weaving wire once around the bottom warp wire. Starting close to the end of your weaving wire, lay the wire over the front of the bottom warp and wrap it around once, away from yourself. Take care that you only wrap the bottom wire. Hold the wire taut to make sure you get a tight coil.[27]
Once your coil is complete, the weaving wire should pass back over the front of the warp wire.
Don’t start at the very end of the weaving wire. Try to leave a bit of a tail (around 1–2 inches (2.5–5.1 cm)) so that you can secure the weave when you’re finished.
Depending on what you plan to do with your woven wire, you may wish to start the weave at least .75 inches (1.9 cm) from the ends of the warp wires.
5
Pass the weaving wire under the top warp wire and coil it twice. Draw your weaving wire up so that it passes behind the top warp wire, then wrap it around the top wire 2 times. This time, pull the wire towards you instead of away from you. The weaving wire should end up in front of the top warp wire.[28]
If your coils are not close enough together, you can nudge them down the warp wires with your fingernails. If you use pliers, you may damage your wire.
6
Bring the weaving wire behind the bottom warp wire and coil twice. This time, coil the weaving wire away from you. From here, you will start the pattern over and continue until your weave reaches the desired length.[29]
If you like, you can vary the pattern by doing more coils between each pass. You can even alternate—e.g., doing 2 coils on one side and 4 on the other.
As you get more experienced with 2-wire weaving techniques, you can begin experimenting with weaves that incorporate 3 or more warp wires.
7
Snip off the ends of the warp wire and tuck them in. Once you’ve achieved the length you want, use your wire clippers to cut off the tails of the warp wire. Gently pinch in any sharp edges with your chain nose pliers.[30]
If you like, you can do a couple of extra coils on each end for more security.
8
Incorporate your woven wire into a pendant, bracelet, or ring. Woven wire can make a striking addition to many types of jewelry. Once the wire is woven, you can bend it into the shape of your choice by hand or using pliers.
For example, to make a simple ring, take a short section (about 3.5 inches (8.9 cm)) of woven wire and wrap it around a ring mandrel. Use round-nosed pliers to curl the 4 ends of the warp wires into elegant spirals.[31]
You can also use woven wire to create striking pendants incorporating beads or undrilled stones.[32]
Tips
To learn more advanced wire jewelry techniques, consider taking a class at a local jewelry or crafting store. You can also find a wide variety of wire jewelry classes and tutorials online.
You can use heavy wire (e.g., 14 or 16 gauge) and pliers to make decorative elements, such as hearts or spirals.[33] Add a delicate touch by wrapping a few coils of fine wire (such as 26 gauge) around the thicker elements.
You can also use crochet techniques with wire to make delicate, lacy pieces. For these projects, you will need fine, dead soft wire, standard wire-working tools, and a set of crochet needles.[34]
Some people are allergic to certain metals, so keep this in mind if you are planning to sell your jewelry. Your buyers may need to know if your jewelry contains nickel or other common allergens.
Things You’ll Need
Selecting Your Materials
Wire cutters
Round-nose pliers
Chain-nose pliers
Wires in various colors, materials, gauges, and levels of hardness
Findings (such as ear hooks, clasps, chains, and pins)
Creating Basic Wire Links
20-gauge half-hard wire
Wire cutters
Round-nose pliers
Chain-nose pliers
Beads
Making Simple Wire-Wrapped Pendants
A stone or other object for your pendant
20 to 22-gauge half-hard wire
Wire clippers
Chain-nose pliers
Round-nose pliers
Pencil or other object with a round cross-section
Doing a Basic 2-Wire Weave
16 to 20-gauge half-hard wire
24 to 26-gauge dead soft wire
Masking tape or ring clamp (optional)
Chain-nose pliers
Wire cutters
Round-nose pliers (for shaping the finished weave)
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About This Article
Tested By:
wikiHow Video Team
This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. Together, they cited information from 34 references. wikiHow’s Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article meets our high standards.
Co-authors: 7
Updated: September 28, 2019
Views: 1,544
Categories: Featured Articles | Bracelet Projects
Article Summary
References
↑http://academic.emporia.edu/abersusa/go340/wrap.htm
↑https://jewelrytutorialhq.com/all-about-jewelry-wire-which-gauge-wire-to-use-for-what/
↑https://jewelrytutorialhq.com/all-about-jewelry-wire-wire-hardness-explained/
↑https://www.jewelrymaking-beads-library.com/earring-finding.html
↑https://youtu.be/2qjNzvE2-D8?t=69
↑https://youtu.be/2qjNzvE2-D8?t=90
↑https://youtu.be/2qjNzvE2-D8?t=116
↑https://youtu.be/2qjNzvE2-D8?t=158
↑https://youtu.be/2qjNzvE2-D8?t=260
More References
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How to Determine Gear Ratio

How to Determine Gear Ratio
Co-authored by wikiHow Staff
Updated: August 12, 2019 | References

In mechanical engineering, a gear ratio is a direct measure of the ratio of the rotational speeds of two or more interlocking gears. As a general rule, when dealing with two gears, if the drive gear (the one directly receiving rotational force from the engine, motor, etc.) is bigger than the driven gear, the latter will turn more quickly, and vice versa. We can express this basic concept with the formula Gear ratio = T2/T1, where T1 is the number of teeth on the first gear and T2 is the number of teeth on the second.[1]

Method One of Two:
Finding the Gear Ratio of a Gear Train
Two Gears

1
Start with a two-gear train. To be able to determine a gear ratio, you must have at least two gears engaged with each other — this is called a “gear train.” Usually, the first gear is a “drive gear” attached to the motor shaft and the second is a “driven gear” attached to the load shaft. There may also be any number of gears between these two to transmit power from the drive gear to the driven gear: these are called “idler gears.”[2]
For now, let’s look at a gear train with only two gears in it. To be able to find a gear ratio, these gears have to be interacting with each other — in other words, their teeth need to be meshed and one should be turning the other. For example purposes, let’s say that you have one small drive gear (gear 1) turning a larger driven gear (gear 2).

2
Count the number of teeth on the drive gear. One simple way to find the gear ratio between two interlocking gears is to compare the number of teeth (the little peg-like protrusions at the edge of the wheel) that they both have. Start by determining how many teeth are on the drive gear. You can do this by counting manually or, sometimes, by checking for this information labeled on the gear itself.[3]
For example purposes, let’s say that the smaller drive gear in our system has 20 teeth.
3
Count the number of teeth on the driven gear. Next, determine how many teeth are on the driven gear exactly as you did before for the drive gear.
Let’s say that, in our example, the driven gear has 30 teeth.
4
Divide one teeth count by the other. Now that you know how many teeth are on each gear, you can find the gear ratio relatively simply. Divide the driven gear teeth by the drive gear teeth. Depending on your assignment, you may write your answer as a decimal, a fraction, or in ratio form (i.e., x : y).[4]
In our example, dividing the 30 teeth of the driven gear by the 20 teeth of the drive gear gets us 30/20 = 1.5. We can also write this as 3/2 or 1.5 : 1, etc.
What this gear ratio means is that the smaller driver gear must turn one and a half times to get the larger driven gear to make one complete turn. This makes sense — since the driven gear is bigger, it will turn more slowly.[5]
More than Two Gears
1
Start with a gear train of more than two gears. As its name suggests, a “gear train” can also be made from a long sequence of gears — not just a single driver gear and a single driven gear. In these cases, the first gear remains the driver gear, the last gear remains the driven gear, and the ones in the middle become “idler gears.” These are often used to change the direction of rotation or to connect two gears when direct gearing would make them unwieldy or not readily available.[6]
Let’s say for example purposes that the two-gear train described above is now driven by a small seven-toothed gear. In this case, the 30-toothed gear remains the driven gear and the 20-toothed gear (which was the driver before) is now an idler gear.
2
Divide the teeth numbers of the drive and driven gears. The important thing to remember when dealing with gear trains with more than two gears is that only the driver and driven gears (usually the first and last ones) matter. In other words, the idler gears don’t affect the gear ratio of the overall train at all. When you’ve identified your driver gear and your driven gear, you can find the gear ratio exactly as before.
In our example, we would find the gear ratio by dividing the thirty teeth of the driven gear by the seven teeth of our new driver. 30/7 = about 4.3 (or 4.3 : 1, etc.) This means that the driver gear has to turn about 4.3 times to get the much larger driven gear to turn once.
3
If desired, find the gear ratios for the intermediate gears. You can find the gear ratios involving the idler gears as well, and you may want to in certain situations. In these cases, start from the drive gear and work toward the load gear. Treat the preceding gear as if it were the drive gear as far as the next gear is concerned. Divide the number of teeth on each “driven” gear by the number of teeth on the “drive” gear for each interlocking set of gears to calculate the intermediate gear ratios.
In our example, the intermediate gear ratios are 20/7 = 2.9 and 30/20 = 1.5. Note that neither of these are equal to the gear ratio for the entire train, 4.3.
However, note also that (20/7) × (30/20) = 4.3. In general, the intermediate gear ratios of a gear train will multiply together to equal the overall gear ratio.
Method Two of Two:
Making Ratio/Speed Calculations
1
Find the rotational speed of your drive gear. Using the idea of gear ratios, it’s easy to figure out how quickly a driven gear is rotating based on the “input” speed of the drive gear. To start, find the rotational speed of your drive gear. In most gear calculations, this is given in rotations per minute (rpm), though other units of velocity will also work.[7]
For example, let’s say that in the example gear train above with a seven-toothed driver gear and a 30-toothed driven gear, the drive gear is rotating at 130 rpms. With this information, we’ll find the speed of the driven gear in the next few steps.
2
Plug your information into the formula S1 × T1 = S2 × T2. In this formula, S1 refers to the rotational speed of the drive gear, T1 refers to the teeth in the drive gear, and S2 and T2 to the speed and teeth of the driven gear. Fill in the variables until you have only one left undefined.
Often, in these sorts of problems, you’ll be solving for S2, though it’s perfectly possible to solve for any of the variables. In our example, plugging in the information we have, we get this:
130 rpms × 7 = S2 × 30
3
Solve. Finding your remaining variable is a matter of basic algebra. Just simplify the rest of the equation and isolate the variable on one side of the equals sign and you will have your answer. Don’t forget to label it with the correct units — you can lose points for this in schoolwork.
In our example, we can solve like this:
130 rpms × 7 = S2 × 30
910 = S2 × 30
910/30 = S2
30.33 rpms = S2
In other words, if the drive gear spins at 130 rpms, the driven gear will spin at 30.33 rpms. This makes sense — since the driven gear is much bigger, it will spin much slower.
Community Q&A
Question
If a 38 tooth gear running at 360rpm is driving another gear at 144rpm, what is the number of teeth on the driven gear?
Community Answer
T1*S1=S2*T2 where, T1=number of teeth on the driver gear, S1= angular speed on the driver gear, T2=number of teeth on the driven gear and S2=angular speed on the driven gear. 38 teeth*360rpm=T2*144rpm. T2=95 teeth on the driven gear.
Question
How do I determine my gear ratio in my gear box?
Community Answer
If you can not see the gears you can mark the shaft and the start point on the gear box and count the number of times it revolves when you spin the other shaft one full rotation.
Question
What is gear up and gear down?
Community Answer
Gear up is when you drive a smaller gear with a larger gear thus creating a faster RPM at the output but less torque. Gear down is to drive a larger gear with a smaller gear creating a slower RPM at the output but more torque.
Question
How is gear ratio related to a gear train?
Community Answer
The number of teeth on your drive gear and on your driven gear determines the speed of driven gear.
Question
What is breaking torque?
Community Answer
Breaking torque is the actual torque applied after all the engine inefficiencies (frictional torque) are removed from the torque the engine is calculated to produce (indicated torque).
Question
How do I determine the speed ratio between two gears given the RPM of each?
Community Answer
Simply divide the 2 numbers the same way you would if you had the number of teeth of each gear.
Question
Can we mesh a gear having 200 teeth with a 15-toothed gear? What is the affect of the gear ratio?
Community Answer
Yes. For each 1 rpm of the 200-toothed gear, the 15-toothed gear does 13.33 rpm.
Question
If the wheels are spinning at 500 RPM, what would be the gear ratio?
Community Answer
In order to answer this question, we need to know the Drive shaft RPM. Once you know that, it’s very simple math to determine the ratio.
Question
How is the velocity of the gear ratio dependent on the radius of the gears?
Community Answer
For two gears to be driving/meshing against one another, they must have the same tooth design/pitch. So a gear with 80 teeth compared to a compatible gear with 100 teeth should have 80% of the diameter.
Question
What is the connection between lpm and rpm?
Community Answer
Liters per minute = lpm (in terms of liquid). Rotations per minute = rpm (in terms of solid parts).
Video

Tips
The power needed to drive the load is geared up or down from the motor by the gear ratio. The motor must be sized to provide the power needed by the load after the gear ratio is taken in to consideration. A geared up system (where load RPM is greater than motor RPM) will require a motor that delivers optimal power at lower rotational speeds.
To see the principles of gear ratio in action, take a ride on your bike! Notice that it is easiest to go up hills when you have a small gear in front and a big one in the back. While it’s easier to turn the smaller gear with the leverage from your pedals, it takes many rotations to get your rear wheel to rotate compared to the gear settings you’d use for flat sections, making you go slower.
A geared down system (where load RPM is less than motor RPM) will require a motor that delivers optimal power at higher rotational speeds.

Co-authors: 31
Updated: August 12, 2019
Views: 1,221,345
Article Rating: 85% – 47 votes
Categories: Car Maintenance and Repair | Cars & Other Vehicles
Article Summary
References
↑http://bowlesphysics.com/images/Robotics_-_Gears_and_Gear_Ratios.pdf
↑http://www.demandaam.com/technical-support/aam-technical-tips/to-determine-gear-ratio
↑https://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/engines-equipment/gear-ratio2.htm
↑https://sciencing.com/calculate-gear-ratio-6495601.html
↑http://bowlesphysics.com/images/Robotics_-_Gears_and_Gear_Ratios.pdf
↑https://www.sae.org/binaries/content/assets/cm/content/learn/education/motortoycar-samplelessonplan.pdf
↑https://sciencing.com/calculate-speed-ratio-7598425.html
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How to Clean the Bottom of an Oven

How to Clean the Bottom of an Oven
Co-authored by Michelle Driscoll
Updated: August 28, 2019

Cleaning the gunk that’s built up on the bottom of your oven may seem like a difficult task. But it’s actually really simple, and you have a variety of cleaning options to choose from. Whether you decide to use an industrial oven cleaner or a more natural alternative, you first have to prepare your oven to be cleaned.

Method One of Three:
Using the Self-Cleaning Cycle

1
Clear out the oven before you clean it. Take out all of the oven racks so you can reach and clean the bottom more easily. Remove any other items like a pizza stone or any trays that may have been left in there.[1]
Clean the oven racks before you put them back into the oven after you clean the bottom.
2
Remove large food particles from the bottom of the oven. Use an old sponge, paper towels, or a cloth to scrub off large bits of food and grease that may have collected on the bottom of your oven. Lots of built up grease and food can prevent a cleaning solution from being effective.[2]
A cleaning solution will be more effective when it’s applied directly to the surface of the bottom of the oven, rather than a large chunk of food.

3
Use your oven’s self-cleaning cycle. If your oven has a self-cleaning cycle, allow it to run until it’s finished. Self-cleaning cycles will bake the grease and food particles and make them dry and crispy so they’re easier to remove.[3]
Depending on your oven, self-cleaning cycles can take up to 3 hours.
Warning: Grease can create toxic smoke. If the oven begins to fill with lots of smoke, you may need to turn it off and clean the bottom of your oven by hand.

4
Wipe the bottom of your oven with a damp rag or paper towel. After your oven has finished its self-cleaning cycle, there will be a layer of ash on the bottom of the oven. Use a damp cloth or paper towel to remove all of the ash from the inside of your oven before you add any cleaning solutions or it could cake together.[4]
Method Two of Three:
Applying an Industrial Cleaning Product

1
Put on rubber cleaning gloves and safety glasses. Chemical oven cleaners can be really caustic and can burn your skin and eyes. Wear safety glasses and a pair of sturdy rubber cleaning gloves to create a heavy-duty barrier between your skin and the oven cleaner.[5]
Don’t use disposable gloves as they may not be enough to prevent the cleaner from getting onto your skin.
2
Lay down newspapers or paper towels on the floor in front of the oven. When you apply the oven cleaner to the bottom of your oven, some of it may spill or run out of the oven. Use newspapers or paper towels to soak up any excess cleaner.[6]
3
Spray the cleaner onto the bottom of the oven using a sweeping motion. Hold the spray can of cleaner about 8–10 inches (20–25 cm) from the surface of the bottom of the oven and apply the cleaner using back and forth sweeping motions.[7]
Tip: Do not spray on the heating elements of the oven or it could cause problems when you turn on your oven to use it. Keep the cleaning spray contained to the bottom of the oven.

4
Let the cleaner sit for at least 30 minutes. Check the can to see the specific waiting time, but most oven cleaners need to sit for 30 minutes before you wipe it clean. Don’t disturb the oven while the cleaner is working.[8]
Keep the oven closed so the fumes are contained.
5
Wipe the bottom of the oven clean with a damp cloth. After the oven cleaner has been allowed to sit for 30 minutes, open the oven and use a damp cloth to wipe the bottom clean. If there are any sticky patches of residue, you can use a scrub brush or sponge to scrub it.[9]
Get into the corners and crevices to remove all of the dirt and the cleaner.
Method Three of Three:
Using Natural Cleaning Alternatives
1
Use baking soda and vinegar to clean without toxic chemicals. Mix 1⁄2 cup (120 mL) of baking soda with 3 tablespoons (44 mL) of water in a bowl, and mix it to form a thick paste. Spread the paste on the bottom of your oven and let it sit for 12 hours, or overnight. Then wipe the bottom of your oven with a damp cloth. Fill a spray bottle with white vinegar, spray the inside of the oven, and wipe away the foamy mixture.[10]
The white vinegar will react with the baking soda and make a foamy cleaning mixture.
You don’t need to let the foam sit in the oven. Wipe the oven clean right after you spray the vinegar.
If you’re in a hurry, apply the baking soda paste, let it sit for 15 minutes, and then spray it with vinegar and wipe it away.
Tip: Use a pumice or microfiber sponge for any difficult-to-remove stains.

2
Bake lemons in your oven to clean the bottom. Preheat your oven to 250 °F (121 °C) and fill an oven-safe bowl about ⅓ of the way full with clean water. Slice 2 lemons in half and squeeze the juice into the water and then drop the lemons into the bowl of water. Place the bowl on a center rack and let it bake for 1 hour, then use a damp cloth to wipe the bottom of your oven.[11]
Let the oven cool down enough to where it’s still warm, but you can reach into it to wipe the bottom.
Use a wet scouring pumice or microfiber sponge to scrub difficult stains.

3
Spread salt onto the bottom of the oven to clean it. Preheat your oven to 150 °F (66 °C) and sprinkle regular table salt all over the bottom of the oven. Put on oven mitts to protect your hands and use a damp sponge or rag to scrub the bottom of the oven while the oven is still warm.[12]
The salt acts as an abrasive and will make the grime easy to wipe away.
Tips
Clean your oven regularly, especially right after a spill. The longer you go between cleanings, the harder it is to clean up the mess.
Things You’ll Need
Using the Self-Cleaning Cycle
Cloth, rag, sponge, or paper towels
Applying an Industrial Cleaning Product
Rubber cleaning gloves
Newspapers or paper towels
Spray oven cleaner
Using Natural Cleaning Alternatives
1⁄2 cup (120 mL) of baking soda
Bowl (to mix)
White vinegar
Spray bottle
2 lemons
Table salt
Scouring pumice or microfiber sponge (optional)

How to Support the Arts @johnnyblue1

<a href=”https://www.revenuehits.com/lps/pubref/?ref=@RH@UqQlDA1XatG0U0CMP3j86Wr8uAFOCd_U6JiecLcO7yA&#8221; target=”_blank”><img src=”https://revenuehits.com/publishers/media/img/v4/250x250_v4.jpg&#8221; border=”0″></a>

How to Support the Arts
Author Info
Updated: October 17, 2018

If you want to support the arts and the creative people behind art, these steps will offer some direction.

Method One of Five:
Supporting the arts with your money

1
Buy the arts! Don’t argue about the price, just look at your budget and decide what you need and want in life. No matter what your income or social class, you have at least some entertainment budget and you have choices in what to get for your necessities. When buying art, you support an artist in his or her pursuit of art, so every little bit counts. The following steps provide practical suggestions for purchases that support the arts.
Both fine art and artisan creations (crafts, chefs and arts that aren’t seen as fine art) support the local economy as well as give you a higher quality of lifestyle. You may find you can afford more personal luxury after you know these artists and discover what you like most. They also need to eat, do their laundry, pay their rent and local taxes on everything, so they are also helping everyone else in the area keep their jobs by pouring your spending money into building a stronger community. In all of these things, follow your personal tastes.
Don’t buy stuff you don’t need or like just to support the arts. Specifically support the artists and artisans whose work you enjoy and collect more of it over the years as they grow artistically. Your collection will deepen as well as broaden and you’ll be an important patron to these artists. It’s a luxury, so the point is to indulge yourself and get the best of their work.

2
Support the indie artist first. When deciding to go out for a show, consider tickets for live theater instead of a movie or an indie film rather than a first-run blockbuster. You’re supporting new actors, directors, producers and live theatrical houses when you make these choices. If a favorite comes along go ahead and get the first run viewing but opt for a matinee to save money so you can also see the indie film. You’ll have more variety in your viewing pleasure and your dates may find that you are more educated, sophisticated and intellectual than if you just go to the same movies everyone talks about.
3
Buy real paintings and drawings from living artists to decorate your home. Collect real art within your budget. If you like artists you can’t afford, consider smaller original pieces, sketches rather than paintings or archival limited edition prints. Then take care of your art collection by storing it in a cool, dark, dry place (attic, closet or other air conditioned indoor area).
Frame everything and look up basic art conservation for collectors. If you vary which artists you collect, the entire collection will appreciate in value. You may not know which of your collections will become super valuable by the artist’s fame growing, but your kids and grandkids will have an incredible legacy if you spread that investment around — and do it from the heart.
Buy the artwork you fall in love with. Then stash them if your tastes change because collectors or your kids may love them later.
4
Buy books from living authors at full price. Very often discounts and bargains get taken out of the author’s royalties. The author gets paid on the net, not on the gross value of the books printed. If it’s print-on-demand and you discover independent authors you like, always purchase them direct from the author’s website versus Amazon.
If you collect e-books from living authors, you won’t need as many bookcases.
Don’t feel bad about purchasing hardcover versions of paperbacks or e-books you liked and want to reread, that’s a way to reduce your bookshelves to manageable.
5
Buy tickets to music, dance and other live performances. Again, do this within budget and focus it on your tastes. You may like Riverdance more than you like formal ballet, or you may prefer live theater off-off-Broadway types of productions. You may like concerts with big famous bands or symphony orchestras or opera. Yes, this includes live theatre as mentioned above or any type of performance art you enjoy.
Pay full price tickets to magicians and musicians.
When you pass a street performer, put some money into the performer’s hat or tip box.
Buy CDs of independent musicians who self produce them, you may be launching a someday-famous band and have a collectible — or just have a beloved CD of famous music. And if you download their music, pay for it––don’t be a freeloader as the “free music” attitude has ruined the livelihood of many a struggling yet very talented musician.
Be polite and quiet during live performances. This is especially important in pubs that have Celtic music, as the Celtic tradition is very keen on respect for bards. Don’t talk during live performances. You’re not only distracting the audience who’d like to hear the music, you may be distracting the musicians too and throwing them off their stride.
6
Hire live local musicians for your personal events — weddings, graduation parties, child’s bar or bat mitzvahs, Sweet Sixteens, family reunions or get-togethers. Why not celebrate your anniversary by hiring a live musician to serenade your spouse at a romantic dinner — or have a romantic dinner at home with a musician performing that you both love? Any kind of holiday or personal event can become lavish if you have live music. Book them well in advance, talk to them in person after a concert and find out their rates.
Find out when the band’s off season is and what causes it. You may wind up getting a bargain or a shorter wait time if you book them during a time of year they don’t get many gigs. The opposite of tourist season is often good.
For the holidays, try to book the band early, so you’re the one that gets them for your holiday party.
If you like variety, turn your annual music party into a “guess what the band is” event.
7
If you need to buy new clothes, especially for evening or party wear, consider finding a textile artist, tailor, seamstress or other artisan. Instead of going to an upscale shop where you’ll pay a high price for fancy clothing, go to an artist who will fit it to your individual body much better, create it to suit your precise looks, complexion, style and taste, and support another type of independent artist. You will get more than your money’s worth because a quality handmade original garment will last longer and if you pay for their best work, wear better than anything from even an expensive store. You can reduce the size of your wardrobe while raising its quality.
Buy handmade boots and shoes from leather crafters and artists. Again, they will be expensive but they’ll fit better, look better and wear much longer than shoes and boots from stores.
If you like buying shoes often, find your favorite artisan and have new ones designed for you periodically for fun. You might start getting a “regular customer” discount working one on one with the artist instead of just purchasing something made by mass production to sell to thousands of others. Remember, your shoes are unique, unlike anyone else’s. If they were made to fit your Christmas dress and you love them, maybe take them to your clothing designer next year to get a new Christmas dress inspired by the shoes. Artists sometimes work together on things like that. The more you know them, the more personal and unique their works are and the closer they come to your personal tastes.
8
Have jewelry handcrafted for you by artists. On a low budget, start with small silver and semiprecious stones. Once you’re up in a fine jewelry bracket, you can pay for more elaborate workmanship and more expensive materials. Especially pay attention to their original pieces or commission original pieces. Buying the stock rings and necklaces they have on hand helps the artists to survive, but when you choose their best work or commission something unique that takes the best of their skills, you also feed their souls.
9
Eat out at small chef-owned original restaurants. Food is an art form, so is ambiance, these one-of-a-kind restaurants are sometimes a lot higher quality than chain restaurants. Once you find your favorites, you’re likely to get personal attention and extra good service for a more enjoyable experience.
10
Buy handmade toys, furnishings, furniture and gifts from local artists. No matter what it is, if a local artist makes it, you are getting originality and personal attention. Your entire home can become a collection of treasured, unique, beautiful objects. Many of those things will be higher quality than manufactured goods.
11
Buy locally grown food from farmers and gardeners. Hire local landscapers to take care of your yard, unless you’re a gardener. Find the ones who are artists, look at their other gardens, then give them some artistic freedom. Yes, the flowers in your yard and the landscaping can be artwork that is an expression of who you are and what you love.
Method Two of Five:
Asking for a commissioned piece of artwork
1
When buying art, choose an artist you enjoy (of any kind, performance or tangible) and then keep your description of your commission simple. Stick to the type of work that’s their specialty.
Don’t haggle over changes, give them a hard time or get too controlling. Part of supporting the arts is to encourage the artist to go on being an artist. You’re not buying real arts in order to get the cheapest bargain or rip off the painter for a masterpiece by paying less than he did for the materials! If you do that, there’s a good chance the artist will get disgusted, quit and do something else for a living, which reduces the appreciation of that masterpiece.
Method Three of Five:
Leaving compliments for all to see
1
If you bought from a writer, an artist or a musician, review the item on Amazon, Twitter and other places online, especially if you like it. Negative reviews are a warning not to buy from an unreliable seller. The arts are far more personal, your taste comes into it. If you made a mistake and got a book you didn’t like, explain what you didn’t like in a way that people who would like it for what it is will find it enjoyable.
Try something like, “I expected this to be a lovely vampire romance and it turned out to be a horror novel with a fanged stalker who scared me to death. Don’t buy this book if you want to mush over the vampire. But if you like a good scare, it might be just your thing.” You have not only supported the writer (or artist or musician, etc.) by purchasing their original work, you’ve supported them again by word of mouth so they can sell more, make a living, pay taxes in your town, etc.
Method Four of Five:
Localizing your support for the arts
1
Support the arts in your local area. Youth theatres, amateur organizations and school productions need your support! There are hundreds of ways to get involved, whether you’re designing posters, sewing costumes or selling tickets.
Organize and help set up at festivals and fairs. Just helping a bunch of artists and crafters get their stuff unpacked and set up, or helping to organize an event that they can all show up to helps them big time!
Help promote local arts events by posting about them online, blogging them, making flyers or stapling flyers up.
If your town or city has an arts committee, find out what they need volunteers for. If it doesn’t, consider trying to form one.
Some types of local events you can help organize or prepare for are concerts, live performances including outdoor ones, art fairs, studio tours for artists, book signings and poetry readings, any of the arts can benefit from a public event and its exposure. If the artists have any recordings or physical things to sell, be sure the event’s rules allow them to sell their works even if the performance or show is free.
2
As you know practice makes perfect, so keep practicing and cultivating regularly. Be sincere.
Take classes in humanities or art, music or literature appreciation at your local community college. Some local community charges have a much lower “audit” fee if you attend the class but don’t take the tests, get a grade or college credit for it. When you’re attending just to improve your appreciation of the arts, auditing is just as good as taking the class to get in the right number of Humanities credits and leaves you more in your budget to buy real art, pay local musicians, get tickets, etc.
Method Five of Five:
Getting involved in the arts yourself
1
Get involved! The arts are about creativity and self-expression, so whatever your passion, get out there and enjoy the art. Arts are broad, including drawing, painting, performing, street theater, making murals, crafting, engaging the community in artistic projects and much more, so there are plenty of things to explore and find your own artistic niche within.
If you haven’t yet discovered the activity that’s for you, find out about free or cheap tester classes you can join. Ask if you can borrow materials initially, or look online for many cheap options such as auctions of art materials people no longer need.
2
Do some reading. Go to your local library and find books on photography, art, ballet or even the art of performance.
Read up on these arts online, whatever your particular interests are. There are many reviews and articles on all of the arts available for free. That frees your budget to make knowledgeable purchases from local artists.
3
Go to a museum or art gallery. Find an art, ballet, photo or performance museum. If you can’t go in person, see online exhibits if they are available.
When on vacation, visit museums and galleries in your vacation area. You’ll broaden your appreciation of your favorite arts and appreciate your local artists’ works even more by deepening your knowledge. You’re on vacation anyway, so why not see what artists and musicians, etc., are producing in the cool place you visited? If you take vacations in the same place every year as some people enjoy doing, you can become an annual regular and support particular artists — the local painter in your holiday spot, the little pub that always has good Celtic music, that theatre, the opera house.
If you like opera, definitely get at least bargain tickets and experience it live. Opera houses operate on a shoestring despite the number of millionaires that donate. They need to sell those empty cheap student seats at the back and it’s a wonderful experience. The productions cost so much and involve so many live people not only performing but doing all the work of creating the production that they’re always operating at a brutal budget. If you’re an opera lover who lives near an opera house, consider volunteering your time and effort to help keep the house going.
4
Donate to charities who support the arts or donate to organizations directly. For example, the National Endowment for the Arts, who help art programs throughout America. Donate to art programs You can donate to programs in your school or city.
Organize a monthly art hop. Sign up various art venues in your area that will open their doors on one evening per month. A map and list could be offered in advance to help those planning their tours. Finger foods and beverages could be served at each spot.
Donate directly to local theatres, performance companies and arts events. Many of them accept donations. Your local arts council and local theatre troupe may need the donations more than something as big as the National Endowment for the Arts.
Support PBS. Make a steady annual donation or watch when their pledge drive auctions and bid on things you want. Volunteer to work the phones at PBS pledge drives. PBS always needs it, everywhere, and doing this will also get more of your favorite programming purchased by your local PBS station. They listen to fan requests.
Purchase new copies of your favorite books at full price from living authors and donate them to your local library. The community will be better for it, those that can’t afford it will get to read it sooner, those that might never have found your favorite author may wind up buying their own copy when they have to return it. Everyone wins, and your author is more likely to continue writing instead of taking up something else because the bills need to be paid.
5
Get out there and experience it! The only way to boost your appreciation and support of the arts is to experience as many performances as possible. Be open-minded and you never know which new genres you will discover.
To save money, opt for cheaper seats or buy last-minute tickets from discount websites.
If you can’t afford original paintings from your favorite painters, consider their smaller works, sketches or limited edition prints. Whether you opt for lower priced works from the newest indie unknowns or the lower priced works by more successful artists, you will always be supporting the arts — and that supports the economy both local and national.
6
Get to know the artists. All of the arts are about communication. Forming relationships with artists and artisans, studying art appreciation and encouraging those that are growing in their arts also improves the quality of your own life. From furnishings and objects that you enjoy more than mass produced goods, to the social success of becoming more refined and knowledgeable to the inner spiritual growth that comes from awareness of beauty, supporting the arts will enrich your life in more ways than you would expect.
Tips
Share your own artwork with others. There are chemists who are poets, lawyers who are actors and doctors who are painters. Speak up for the arts within your profession, trade and job, to allow others to feel that it’s not only okay to be creative but to also make the time to exercise creativity.
Watch artsy TV. Currently, the only artsy TV network in the USA is Ovation TV.
Things You’ll Need
Books
Transportation
Computer
Internet connection
Television
Money
supplies:
For Drawing and Painting:
pastels
pencils
easel
sketchbook
canvas
For Photography:
camera
photo editing software
photo printing paper
photo printer
For Ballet:
ballet school/teacher
music
ballet bar
For Filming:
camera(s)
scripts (drama)
word processing software (scriptwriting)
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About This Article
wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. To create this article, 20 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. This article has also been viewed 58,284 times.
Co-authors: 20
Updated: October 17, 2018
Views: 58,284
Article Rating: 63% – 29 votes
Categories: Featured Articles | Arts and Entertainment
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How to Be Talented in Multiple Areas @johnnyblue1

How to Be Talented in Multiple Areas
Co-authored by Paul Chernyak, LPC
Updated: March 28, 2019

Setting out to increase your talents and abilities in multiple disciplines is an audacious endeavor. It’s also very feasible to accomplish. In fact, it’s far easier to become talented in multiple areas than you may expect. Practicing the skills you wish to improve upon, maintaining a positive mindset, and broadening your base of interest and knowledge can all help you be talented in all sorts of ways.

Method One of Three:
Developing Multiple Talents with Practice

1
Practice. Whatever it is you’re trying to be talented at, you know you have to practice. This is especially true if you hope to be talented in multiple areas. Fortunately, you may not need to practice quite as much as you think, and can likely make the time to practice multiple skills every day. In order to get the most out of the time you put in, you have to focus on what you’re hoping to learn.
Practice two different skills 40-45 minutes each, every day for a month.
Don’t worry if you miss a day of practicing one of your talents once in a while. If you practice each skill almost every day for a month, you’ll have put in about 20 hours of focused practice on improving each of the talents you hope to develop![1]

2
Deconstruct the talents you hope to acquire. In order to practice deliberately and efficiently, you need to make sure you are absolutely focused during practice. One way to help maximize the efficiency of your practice time is to deconstruct the talents you hope to improve upon into specific skills.
Ask yourself; What, specifically, do you need to be good at in order to be more talented at whatever ability you’re developing?
Choose specific objectives to achieve each time you sit down to practice something. Repeat a small task or process many, many times until you’ve mastered it.[2] For instance, if you’re trying to improve your ability to play a sport, choose an extremely basic aspect of playing that sport and spend 45 minutes straight on just that specific aspect.
For example, if you’re hoping to become a better soccer player, dribble a soccer ball back and forth on the field with just one foot.
If you’re hoping to improve your talent as a basketball player, shoot only lay-ups.
Deconstructing your effort to improve one talent will help you improve other talents as well. Following the sports example, doing anything physically active will get you in better shape and improve your coordination, both of which will increase your physical abilities generally.

3
Practice until you can self-correct. Practice enough so that you are able to both notice and correct errors in your execution of a particular ability. (Once you’ve completed a disciplined practice routine, during which you practice almost daily for a month, you will likely reach this point.)
Moving forward, your practice will become more efficient. This is because you have gained a solid base of knowledge from which your talent will more naturally progress.
For instance, if you’re hoping to improve your ability to play an instrument, practice playing the same single notes or chord so frequently than you automatically know exactly what you did wrong when the sound is even a little bit off.
4
Be consistent and persistent. Dabbling and practicing are different things. Jogging or painting twice a week are fun and healthy things to do, but in order to acquire talent, you need to be more disciplined in your pursuit of improvement. Something that may help you be persistent is choosing two very different talents to practice and improve upon during the same time period.
Get in the groove of practicing at the same time of day each day.
Try practicing skills related to two talents you’re hoping to improve upon back-to-back. Get in the habit of practicing one talent then immediately practicing the other.
For example, right when you get home from a daily run, sit down to paint. Grouping your practice sessions together will encourage you to do both consistently.
Work on two widely different talents to increase the variety of your daily activities. Following the example used in this step, doing something active like running pairs well with something creative and contemplative, like painting.
5
Remove distractions during practice. Do not rely entirely on willpower to focus adequately during practice time. Here are a few tips to ensure your practice time is free of interruption:
Set aside a block of time devoted exclusively to practice and commit to practicing for that full length of time. Set a timer if you’d like.
Turn your phone on silent.
Make sure there are no screens running in your vicinity (unless you’re using them to help you practice).
If you have music playing, consider choosing something without lyrics.
Method Two of Three:
Maintaining a Talent-Inducing Mindset
1
Defy negative thoughts. In order to maintain talent in multiple areas, train yourself to prevent negative thoughts that can diminish your ability to work towards achieving the multiple goals you set for yourself. There are several ways to rid your mind of negative thinking:[3]
Overcome fear. Audacious, yes. But reflect on what’s holding you back. The most common barriers to acquiring talent are based on your emotions.[4] Recognize this and prevent emotional perspectives, such as fear, from preventing you from pursuing whatever talent you wish to acquire.
Filter out the negative. We tend to filter out the positive and be overly concerned with the negative, especially in terms of our perspective on our own abilities. Don’t fall for this mental trap. Contemplate your room for improvement only so far as it motivates you to continue improving.
Recognize the middle ground. Abandon the concept of perfection. Don’t think that you must be perfect at something to consider yourself talented.
2
Strengthen your position with positive thinking. Optimism isn’t going to make you good at anything on its own, but it will help. Recognize that it is objectively within your control to decide how to think about something, especially goals you set for yourself and your ability to accomplish them.
Respond to negative thoughts that arise by re-framing them in equally true, but more positive perspectives. For instance:[5]
Instead of thinking, “I’ve never done this before, and it seems hard,” think, “Here’s an opportunity to learn, and there are a few different ways to approach this.”
Instead of thinking, “I’m too lazy” or “There’s no way I can do that,” tell yourself, “I haven’t put enough time into this, but I can at least try it and see how it goes.”
Finally, don’t get discouraged by thoughts about how slowly your talents are improving. Decide to tell yourself that it’s worth one more try.
3
Practice the thinking part too. Even convincing yourself to favor positive thinking takes practice. It will pay off though. Become less critical of the world around you, and of yourself, simply by repeating positive sentiments to yourself and pushing away negative thoughts.
Maintaining a positive mindset will not only improve your mood, but will help motivate you to stick with the hard work required to acquire new talents.[6]
Method Three of Three:
Broadening Your Ability to Gain Talent Generally
1
Monitor your progress. Know that focused practice will not always be fun. Realizing the development of your talents, however, will be. Take note of and appreciate your achievements – such as a new personal record mile time or a particularly compelling painting.
If there are tangible indications of your progress (perhaps especially paintings), place them in locations you will frequently see them in order to motivate yourself to continue practicing and improving upon your talents!
2
Rest. Keep your mind and body ready to practice with focus and energy. More to the point, rest strategically. If the talent you’re trying to improve requires intense physical activity or mental focus, you’re going to have to keep your mind and body conditioned enough to practice effectively.[7]
This may actually require that you do take off one day a week. This is important to do if it improves your ability to practice effectively for the rest of the week.
3
Accept that innate skill is less significant than practice and perseverance. Even the abilities some people seem to be born with come more from training than from inborn talent.[8] This is true for athletes, musicians, and mathematicians!
Know you’ll need some grit. Psychologists have come to use the term “grit” when referring to an attribute held by successful people. Grit indicates both perseverance and passion in pursuing long-term goals.[9]
Overcoming adversity in pursuit of developing your skills also positively contributes to improve your talents more generally. When facing challenges that others might not have to deal with, tell yourself that by overcoming them, you’ll have a step up on everyone else.
4
Improve upon talents that interest you. Even scientists aren’t sure about how to increase talent. The question of how we become good at things is still largely unanswered. We do know that people who are exposed to things that they become drawn to naturally and who then become immersed in those things end up being good at them. With training and practice, people who are already into something become especially good at it. Accept the significance of these findings and act accordingly:[10]
Observe and play without inhibition. Inspiration and curiosity will inevitably hit you and you’ll end up pursuing talents you’ll be interested in enough to stick with.
Ignore the technical aspects of the talent you’re hoping to acquire. You can bring in the technical aspects of perfecting your abilities once you’re committed.
Don’t try to judge where your interests are coming from.
Avoiding these tendencies will allow your more creative and emotional aspirations to get you hooked on something.
5
Read. Reading is a great place to start learning about how you can become more talented in multiple ways. One of the main benefits here is perking your curiosity and motivating yourself to pursue new ways to expand your talents, or to pursue new talents altogether.
Becoming interested in something you’ve read is seen as an indication that you may take especially well to the material.[11] If you become interested in something new, throw yourself at it.
There are literal advantages to reading too: you learn about language and writing, about whatever era of history is relevant to the book, and, of course, about the content contained in the book. You’re immediately more knowledgeable about all sorts of stuff, just by dragging your eyes back and forth across a page and interpreting a bunch of printed words!
Of course, nothing compares to hands-on experience. Whatever you read about that appeals to you, practice doing it yourself and develop a new talent!
Community Q&A
Question
How can I find hobbies for myself?
Community Answer
I suggest reading wikiHow’s article on finding a hobby for some guidance.
Question
How do I find the best drawing style?
Community Answer
There is not really one “best” drawing style. Every artist has a unique touch; try out several different styles to see which suits yours best and you most enjoy.
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About This Article
Paul Chernyak, LPC
Licensed Professional Counselor
This article was co-authored by Paul Chernyak, LPC. Paul Chernyak is a Licensed Professional Counselor in Chicago. He graduated from the American School of Professional Psychology in 2011.
Co-authors: 10
Updated: March 28, 2019
Views: 60,399
Article Rating: 93% – 114 votes
Categories: Arts and Entertainment
References
↑http://changethis.com/manifesto/106.06.FirstHours/pdf/106.06.FirstHours.pdf
↑https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-happiness/201308/new-theory-elite-performance-0
↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/stress-management/in-depth/positive-thinking/art-20043950?pg=2
↑http://changethis.com/manifesto/106.06.FirstHours/pdf/106.06.FirstHours.pdf
↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/stress-management/in-depth/positive-thinking/art-20043950?pg=2
↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/stress-management/in-depth/positive-thinking/art-20043950?pg=2
↑https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-happiness/201308/new-theory-elite-performance-0
↑https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-happiness/201308/new-theory-elite-performance-0
↑https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-happiness/201308/new-theory-elite-performance-0
More References
Reader Success Stories
JR
Josselyn R.

Dec 31, 2017

“A specific step in this article that stood out to me was Method 1, Step 5: Remove distractions during practice. I…” more
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How To Properly Clean Your Sink In The House.

Wash down the sink. If you have a garbage disposal now is the time to pour baking soda with warm water and/or a lemon peel down the disposal to freshen the drain. If you use a dishwasher clean out the food trap at the bottom and then run the empty dishwasher with a hint of vinegar or baking soda. Don’t forget to wash down the outside too!